Hine (1971– )
Needs 5 Ratings

The Little White Lady 

A successful performance in trials leaves Astor Harris confident of securing an order, but the customer has more than one reason for buying Hine's distinctly third-rate offering.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Joe Hine
...
Astor Harris
...
Walpole Gibb
...
Jeremy Windsor
Sarah Craze ...
Susannah Grey
...
Lady in Sari
John White ...
Badely
Claire Nielson ...
Jean Hurst
Wolfe Morris ...
High Commissioner
David King ...
Bardia Bill
Tom Browne ...
Lieutenant
Tom Marshall ...
John Harris
...
Patricia Harris
Jane Stonehouse ...
Wendy Harris
John Moreno ...
Frank the Chauffeur (as Juan Moreno)
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Storyline

Pendles, Royal Ordnance and Hine are each demonstrating an anti-tank gun to an overseas delegation; Pendles' model performs the best, leaving Astor Harris confident of receiving the order - and securing his own position - while Hine's second-hand gun fails partway through. Having bribed the High Commissioner though, he is certain of getting the order; when Gibb realises this he asks Hine to deliberately lose - having his own reasons for wanting to keep Harris in his position - in return for finding another buyer for Hine's guns. Hine visits the Minister from the delegation and deliberately offends her; telling him to get out she then summons Gibb. For political reasons - exposing the corruption of the High Commissioner and his allies at home - she explains she will still be buying from Hine.

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Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

26 May 1971 (UK)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Crazy Credits

Acknowledgement in closing credits "Barrie Ingham is a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company". See more »

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