Hill Street Blues (1981–1987)
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The Spy Who Came in from Delgado 

Hill, Renko, and Belker work undercover at a seedy downtown salon. Calletano becomes suspicious about a new attractive office assistant who is less than qualified for the position. ... See full summary »

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(created by), (created by) | 7 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Lt. Howard Hunter (as James B. Sikking)
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Lt. Ray Calletano (as René Enriquez)
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Storyline

Hill, Renko, and Belker work undercover at a seedy downtown salon. Calletano becomes suspicious about a new attractive office assistant who is less than qualified for the position. Davenport recommends a lawyer for Frank in the corruption-seeking Sullivan Commission. Hunter uses hounds to try and find wild dogs running around in the city. Written by Anonymous

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Drama

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Release Date:

21 January 1982 (USA)  »

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(DeLuxe)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title comes from the 1963 spy novel 'The Spy Who Came in from the Cold' by John le Carré. See more »

Connections

Spoofs The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Engrossing episode
1 September 2010 | by (The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left) – See all my reviews

Renko (Charles Haid), Hill (Michael Warren), and Belker (Bruce Weitz growling it up with his trademark gruff gusto) work undercover at a seedy saloon. Hunter (a marvelously dry and deadpan James B. Sikking) uses basset hounds to track down a pack of wild dogs. Calletano (nice work by Rene Enriquez) is suspicious of Emily Williams (deliciously essayed with sultry aplomb by ravishing brunette Janet DeMay), a beautiful civilian clerk who comes to work at the station. Davenport (Veronica Hamel) recommends a lawyer for Furillo (the always superb Daniel J. Travanti) for the Sullivan Commission hearings. Dennis Dugan makes a regrettably brief, but still hilarious appearance as the endearingly flaky Captain Freedom; in an amusing and poignant scene Belker tries (and fails) to talk some sense to this raving lunatic and we learn about his possibly tragic and abusive past. This episode's handling of Hunter serves as a classic example of the show's careful and effective balance of humor and drama: Hunter's characteristic overzealous attitude about his job is extremely funny while the scenes with Hunter trapped in a crumbling derelict building with the savage wild dogs are genuinely tense and gripping. Popping up in nifty guest roles are Robin Gammell as shrewd, slippery lawyer Douglas Comstock and Jon Cypher as the ever slimy and manipulative Chief Fletcher Daniels. And this episode offers plenty of intriguing stuff about the dirty and underhanded machinations of city hall politics.


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