Belker goes undercover in a wheelchair and finds himself being shadowed by actual wheelchair bound Gaffney. J.D. is sure Hunter attempted suicide although the latter won't admit it. Bates ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Lt. Howard Hunter (as James B. Sikking)
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Lt. Ray Calletano (as René Enriquez)
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Storyline

Belker goes undercover in a wheelchair and finds himself being shadowed by actual wheelchair bound Gaffney. J.D. is sure Hunter attempted suicide although the latter won't admit it. Bates and Coffey catch missing guard goose Honkey red-winged at a grocery store. Bobby is preparing for one last boxing match before he retires from the game. Written by The TV Archaeologist

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Drama

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Release Date:

8 December 1983 (USA)  »

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(DVD)

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(DeLuxe)

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The title comes from a parody of a series of bumper stickers popular in the 1970s and 1980s, of which the most common one was "Honk if you love Jesus". See more »

Connections

References The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show (1950) See more »

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User Reviews

 
On the money episode
25 February 2016 | by (The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left) – See all my reviews

Hunter (an excellent James Sikking) tries to deny to LaRue (nicely played by Kiel Martin) that he attempted suicide. Belker (Bruce Weitz in peak scruffy form) gets followed by bitter paraplegic Gaffney (an outstanding portrayal by Gary Frank) while working undercover in a wheelchair. Bates (sturdy Betty Thomas) and Coffey (likable Ed Marinaro) catch missing goose Honkey at a grocery store. Hill (a solid performance by Michael Warren) decides to fight in the ring one last time.

The tense relationship between Belker and Gaffney reaches a heartbreaking tragic conclusion due to Belker's inability to open up and admit that he honestly likes the guy. The plot about the goose provides a few good laughs. The conversation between LaRue and Washington (the always smooth Taureen Blacque) about all the cops who have committed suicide speaks volumes about the tremendous stress and pressure of the thankless job of being a police officer. Another subplot about bribery reveals just how deep corruption can run in law enforcement. The scene with Hunter hugging and thanking LaRue for removing the bullets from his gun is quite touching and gives the usually stoic Hunter a chance to display some vulnerability. Contributing spot-on guest contributions are George Wyner as worried district attorney Bernstein, Barney Martin as scared bookie Seltzer, and, in an especially sad role, Guy Boyd as hapless addled washed-up boxer Shields. Best of all, beloved oddball Crispin Glover even pops up in a funny small part as a spaced out stoned junkie.


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