Hill Street Blues: Season 1, Episode 6

Film at Eleven (7 Feb. 1981)

TV Episode  -   -  Drama
7.0
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Furillo agrees to let a local news crew film the precinct. Belker brings in a suspect who believes that he is Dracula. Washington and LaRue capture a woman who is in possession of the gun that shot Hill and Renko.

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Title: Film at Eleven (07 Feb 1981)

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Lt. Howard Hunter (as James B. Sikking)
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Lt. Ray Calletano (as René Enriquez)
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DiCarlo
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Storyline

Furillo agrees to let a local news crew film the precinct. Belker brings in a suspect who believes that he is Dracula. Washington and LaRue capture a woman who is in possession of the gun that shot Hill and Renko.

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Drama

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7 February 1981 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The title uses the advertising expression "film at eleven" to get viewers to turn into the local eleven o'clock news. See more »

Quotes

Sgt. Mick Belker: Bates, tell Kevin here that goin' into a cell is your standard vampire procedure, you tell 'em.
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User Reviews

 
Nifty episode
3 August 2010 | by (The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left) – See all my reviews

The gun that shot Renko (Charles Haid) and Hill (Michael Warren) is uncovered by LaRue (Kiel Martin) and Washington (Taurean Blacque). Belker (Bruce Weitz in excellent gruff'n'growly form) confronts Kevin Herman Dracula (a hilarious performance by Tony Plana), an unhinged kook who thinks he's a vampire. Meanwhile, Furillo (Daniel J. Travanti playing it cool with his trademark unflappable ease) has to deal with a TV news crew filming a typical day at the station. This episode offers several inspired humorous moments, with the definite sidesplitting highlight being when Belker subdues Dracula with an impromptu cross made out of two cigars. Moreover, the character of Dracula and his ultimate grim fate (he hangs himself in his cell) is a prime example of one of the show's key strengths: the comic relief characters are handled in an admirably serious and realistic way instead of being depicted as silly caricatures that are used strictly for cheap laughs. It's also interesting to see the radical contrast of the cold and no-nonsense professional relationship between Furillo and Joyce Davenport (the always terrific Veronica Hamel) and their more warm and playful romantic one. And this particular show makes a fine point about how the police are responsible for the well being of everyone in the station.


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