Hawaii Five-O (1968–1980)
7.8/10
43
1 user 1 critic

How to Steal a Masterpiece 

Thugs break into the heavily-guarded art room of a multimillionaire and steal a Gauguin painting worth a fortune. When Five-O comes to investigate, the millionaire, his secretary and his ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
Det. Steve McGarrett
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Danny Williams
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Chin Ho
...
...
Durkin
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George Herman ...
Sills Anderson
Danielle ...
Evvy Bernstein
Harry Endo ...
Che Fong
Bob Sevey ...
Bob Sevey
Douglas Mossman ...
Frank
Ed Fernandez ...
John Sample (as Edward N. Fernandez)
...
Duke
...
Jeff Koestler
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Storyline

Thugs break into the heavily-guarded art room of a multimillionaire and steal a Gauguin painting worth a fortune. When Five-O comes to investigate, the millionaire, his secretary and his grandson (who are the only inhabitants of the mansion) are surprisingly uncooperative. It turns out that the old man had been planning to sell the painting and had hired two art appraisers to market it. Soon, the group receives a ransom demand. The grandson figures out a way to pay the ransom despite intense Five-O surveillance -- with grandfather, grandson and secretary all leaving to "drop off" the $250,000, leading Five-O members on a wild goose chase, and arriving at the Iolani Palace at the exact same moment. The art appraiser, who wasn't under surveillance, paid the money and got the painting back himself. This bit of mass nose-thumbing really doesn't go over well with McGarrett, who suspects the grandson of stealing the painting to get the ransom money for his own lavish lifestyle. All is not ... Written by Peter Harris

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

12 November 1974 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the second episode directed by star Jack Lord. See more »

Quotes

Charles Ogden: I would give it back. I would give it all back... to have my grandson with me again.
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Crazy Credits

The "Fatata Te Miti" by Paul Gauguin is in The National Gallery in Washington, D.C. See more »

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User Reviews

 
A huge improvement over the last episode as well as one directed by Jack Lord himself...
11 September 2011 | by See all my reviews

The previous episode of "Hawaii Five-O" was a pretty crummy one--with some really poor writing. However, the show was back on track with this show, as the script was much tighter and more entertaining. And, incidentally, it's one of the few episodes directed by Jack Lord himself! The show begins with a very, very intricately conceived robbery. Despite a top-notch security system and guards, a group of men are able to break into the home of a rich guy (Luther Adler) and steal his priceless Gaughin painting. It's odd, as the guy was going to donate the painting on his death to a local museum. It's also odd because stealing a painting is a difficult crime to get away with, as few would consider buying what they know is a stolen artwork. So, not surprisingly, the thieves demand ransom. However, after the ransom is paid and the painting is not returned, it appears there's much more to the story than folks had assumed. I could say a lot more, but this would reveal too much of the plot--and it's an interesting one.

Overall, this episode has nice guest appearances, a very good plot and some nice twists to the story. While it's not among the great episodes of the show, for season Seven it's a HUGE improvement...and the direction was nice.

By the way, in a case of odd casting, George Herman plays a hood in this one AND a different hood in a previous episode! You'd have thought they would have spaced the two shows apart--though, to be fair, the show did not air on the intervening week and there were two weeks between them.


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