Hawaii Five-O (1968–1980)
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Here Today... Gone Tonight 

The No. 2 executive to a reclusive businessman approaches McGarrett. He tells the lawman that he has evidence of illegal activity by his employer. But the executive insists on elaborate ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Al Harrington ...
Ben
...
...
Barry Dean
Sandra Smith ...
Bella Morgan
...
June Fleming
...
...
Fleming
George Oshiro ...
Nathaniel
Harry Endo ...
Al Eben ...
Clarence Garcia ...
1st Guard
Douglas Mossman ...
2nd Guard
...
Whitelaw
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Storyline

The No. 2 executive to a reclusive businessman approaches McGarrett. He tells the lawman that he has evidence of illegal activity by his employer. But the executive insists on elaborate procedures for a more detailed meeting, including having McGarrett attend unarmed. The Governor insists that Danny Williams attend in McGarrett's place. While their meeting occurs, the executive also shows up and kills the chief executive of the company. Now, Danno is the executive's alibi. Written by Bill Koenig

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

23 January 1973 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Dean leaves Danno to get treated, Danno opens the newspaper to get to the crossword puzzle. When he unfolds the paper, The Honolulu Advertiser's (probably) banner is seen at the top (bottom, because he is holding it upside down). The headline is "Nixon Bids ". This is not Nixon bidding farewell, as he would not until a year and a half later, but rather Nixon posturing on the NFL..."Nixon told his attorney general to offer the league a deal: Allow playoff games to be televised in the hometown city, and the president would block any legislation requiring regular-season home games to be televised as well. At the time, the NFL blacked out all home games, whether they were sellouts or not." See more »

Goofs

Danny is seen boarding the helicopter empty handed, yet he has a brief case with a tape recorder in it when he arrives in "Maui". Likewise, when he is returned to Honolulu he leaves the helicopter empty handed, yet he arrives back at Five-O headquarters with boxes, ledgers and other documents in hand. See more »

Quotes

Det. Steve McGarrett: Let me get this straight. Are we talking about crime here?
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User Reviews

 
Cleverly Done Episode Based on a Man being in Two Places at Once
14 June 2009 | by (Ukiah, California) – See all my reviews

"Here Today . . . Gone Tonight" is an enjoyable episode of "Hawaii Five- O" — in many ways, the equivalent of a locked-room mystery, wherein paranoid industrialist Peter Fleming (Douglas Kennedy) has what appears to be the only office atop a tall building in Honolulu, shielded by an elaborate security system (guards, cameras, metal detectors, etc.). All of this would apparently make it impossible for anyone to kill him — or at least, to do so without someone leaving an indelible trail of who got in and out to do it.

The villain — if that's the right word — is played by Monte Markham, making the third of his four appearances on "Five-O" (and the last until the show's final season). Markham plays Barry Dean, Fleming's top deputy, who apparently pulls off the caper while simultaneously being with an impeccable alibi witness — Danny Williams, whom Dean (apparently as paranoid as his boss) has invited to his beach house on Maui to turn over incriminating evidence against Fleming. If Dean was in the beach house on Maui with Danny, how could he be killing Fleming back in Honolulu when there wasn't enough time for him to get there and back?

Writer Jerome Coopersmith has created this elaborate paradox, setting up an intriguing mystery for both McGarrett and the viewer to try to solve. Of course, given that this is "Hawaii Five-O," it's foregone that McGarrett will solve it; this mystery might be dubbed a "howdunnit" instead of a "whodunnit," with the only questions being how McGarrett will figure things out, and how long it will take. Markham, who can simultaneously project both apparent innocence and menace, was an excellent choice for the role of Dean. And because this is one of those episodes — like one of those oh-so-clever bank heists — where the audience spends a lot of time with the villain, one almost comes to be rooting for the bad guy and against McGarrett, given the cleverness of the scheme.

The script also features a number of other interesting touches, including the episode's opening, with an initially confusing montage of scenes with two men — both of them apparently Barry Dean — who exhibit contradictory traits (one a sports fan, the other not; one a conservative dresser, the other not; one a drinker, the other not; etc.) Is this a double, or is it Dean playing two roles? Little touches like this are what make the episode fun to watch, even if there are aspects of the resolution to the mystery that seem a bit far-fetched once it's been solved.

The episode also features two surprisingly strong (if brief) roles for two familiar actresses: Madlyn Rhue plays Fleming's much younger wife June, who apparently can barely tolerate Barry Dean, while Sandra Smith makes her second and final appearance on "Five-O" as an insurance investigator whose company has five million reasons to get out of paying off June Fleming's life insurance policy. Smith's character then takes on what amounts to an undercover role -- one performed in other episodes by a random policewoman (e.g., Patricia Smith in the premiere episode "Full Fathom Five," or Anne Helm in the Season Two outing, "Just Lucky, I Guess"). It was a curious choice to create a new character like this for just one episode; had Smith done this on a semi-regular basis it might have made for interesting continuity, but this is her solo appearance in the role.


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