Have Gun - Will Travel (1957–1963)
8.3/10
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3 user

The Princess and the Gunfighter 

Paladin is hired to find and return a Princess who has run away. When he does he shows her how and why it would be best to return to her kingdom and responsibilities on her own.

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Princess Alisna Sarafina (as Arline Sax)
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Count Gaspar di Cassals
Shirley O'Hara ...
Duchess de Bernal
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First Guide
Ross Sturlin ...
Carl - Second Guide
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Storyline

Paladin is hired to find and return a Princess who has run away. When he does he shows her how and why it would be best to return to her kingdom and responsibilities on her own.

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Western

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Release Date:

21 January 1961 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Quotes

Paladin: If there were no such thing as duty, if there were only wishes, I would wish away every kingdom in the world but this one, and I would never go back.
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User Reviews

 
Roamin' Holiday?
11 January 2016 | by See all my reviews

A Montenegran Princess has vanished from her suite at the Carlton, and her ministerial "minders" fear she may have been kidnapped. They discretely hire Paladin to find her and bring her back, as her continued presence is all that can keep Montenegro safe from from political turmoil.

Paladin locates her with relatively little effort, and it seems Princess Serafina, like the lovely Audrey Hepburn's character in "Roman Holiday", is simply tired of the structured, tightly regulated life she's been forced into from birth, is thrilled with her first taste of "Freedom", and is not the least bit interested in returning to rule a minor Adriatic Nation flanked by Bosnia, Croatia, and Serbia.

Now, what woman could possibly resist a man who quotes both Aristotle and Marcus Aurelius to her over a smouldering campfire? (Between "assignments" and trysts with the San Fancisco Ladies how does Palain ever find time to READ anything?)

Seriously, this episode is all about Duty, be it self-imposed or inherent, and makes a good point. The ending is bittersweet, leading us to ask if "accepting the prison of one's self" just might be the key to True Freedom.


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