Farm owner Clarabelle Callahan has absolute rights to the water supply in her area. Rather than negotiate with Clarabelle, rancher Lamoor Underwood turns to hatred and violence by bringing ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Doc
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...
...
...
...
Katherine Justice ...
Clarabelle
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Maria
...
John
Robert Viharo ...
Dick Shaw
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...
Deems
Joe Di Reda ...
Navin (as Joe di Reda)
Colin Male ...
Gene Hill
Jim Boles ...
Kesting
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Storyline

Farm owner Clarabelle Callahan has absolute rights to the water supply in her area. Rather than negotiate with Clarabelle, rancher Lamoor Underwood turns to hatred and violence by bringing in a gunslinger, Dick Shaw. Unknown to either side, farm hand Pete Brown is the noted gunfighter John Jobson and represents a deadly equalizer for Clarabelle. Written by richardann

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Western

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20 November 1972 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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During the final shootout, Print gets shot and runs up the staircase in his white socks. He returns on he balcony and gets shot by Dillon and falls off with black boots on. See more »

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User Reviews

 
cattlemen versus ranchers
14 September 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Any episode with Morgan Woodward -- especially when he's bearded, grumpy, and gruff-voiced -- is worth watching.

Yes, this is yet another episode about someone on the wrong side of the law (or who appears to be) who wants to reform, but is blocked. Several things make this a better-than average example of such stories.

For one, the dialog is un-clichéd, and gives the impression of 19th-century speech. The writer seems to have done his homework.

Another thing is the well-written "unnecessary" scene another reviewer disparages. Woodward's cattleman -- rather surprisingly -- sees himself, like the Indians, as a preserver of the land. He argues that -- as cattle do little more than eat the grass, which grows back * -- he isn't tearing up the land as the farmers are. This is the sort of dialog Woodward delivers so well. (I added this idea to a rethinking of "The Virginian" I'm working on.)

More-sentimental than I'd like, but excellent performance all around (even in the smaller roles). Worth seeing.

* This was also the point of contention between cattlemen and sheep herders. The sheep tore the grass out by the roots, while cattle only cropped the leaves.


4 of 5 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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