Gunsmoke (1955–1975)
8.2/10
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Renegade White 

A gunfight in the Long Branch forces Matt to arrest a drunk. Letting him go since it was a fair fight, he suspects him of selling guns to the Indians, and goes after him even though he may run into those Indians.

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(story by), (teleplay by)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Doc
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Wild Hog
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Ord Spicer
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Jake
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Storyline

A gunfight in the Long Branch forces Matt to arrest a drunk. Letting him go since it was a fair fight, he suspects him of selling guns to the Indians, and goes after him even though he may run into those Indians.

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Plot Keywords:

indians | drunk | mule | chief | captured | See All (17) »

Genres:

Western

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Release Date:

11 April 1959 (USA)  »

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Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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When is a Renegade a Renegade
21 February 2014 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

Matt falls into the clutches of a gun-runner and a band of renegade Cheyenne.

The entry is most notable for its probing treatment of renegades. Spicer (Phillips) is a renegade white in that he respects no white men or their laws. Instead he's a law unto himself, regardless of race. Wild Hog (Pate) is a renegade Indian at least in the eyes of the army since he and his band have jumped the reservation. But he's a renegade only in the sense that his people are a captive people subject to the laws of their conquerors. By heading back to their ancestral land, the band stays true to their people, and thus are not renegades in that important sense. Hence, writers Meston and Crutchfield draw an important distinction that provides another thoughtful subtext for this peak period of the series.

The narrative itself is less strong, with the usual half-hour expedients (hasty shootouts, etc). Then too, Spicer is almost a caricature of evil, with no shading at all. Also, there's Hollywood's favorite Indian of the period Michael Pate, who at least doesn't need much make-up to fit the part. Nonetheless, most of the 30-minutes is filmed in the wide-open spaces that, at least, has a resemblance to southwestern Kansas, providing a realistic touch. All in all, it's another outstanding entry in this High Noon of TV westerns.


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