Krob is an egotistical, slovenly, amazingly successful author of murder mysteries. A small, unctuous man visits and feeds his vanity with fantastic compliments. eventually revealing he ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Honore St. Etienne
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Maximilian Frederick Krob
Fred Kruger
Chet Stratton ...
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Storyline

Krob is an egotistical, slovenly, amazingly successful author of murder mysteries. A small, unctuous man visits and feeds his vanity with fantastic compliments. eventually revealing he knows his stories are descriptions of crimes he committed and intends extortion. But as the story takes place in jaded, immoral future year 1967, nobody cares so long as the stories entertain. Written by WesternOne

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blackmail | switzerland | balcony | See All (3) »

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Drama

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Release Date:

11 April 1960 (USA)  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

A Rare Straight Role for a Comic Genius
21 August 2011 | by (McDonough, GA) – See all my reviews

Ernie Kovacs is hailed as a comic genius and rightly so, but as many of the comedy greats have shown, they are equally at home in drama. Mary Tyler Moore in "Ordinary People", Dick Van Dyke in "The Runner Stumbles" are just two of the many examples of this.

In the special, "Ernie Kovacs: Television's Original Genius", there is the marvelous clip of Kovacs performing a monologue from Euripides' "The Trojan Women", which he performs marvelously. The ending is too good to tell, but the bit is introduced by the narrator who suggests that there may have been something inside Kovacs that wanted to be taken seriously as an actor.

This episode, which features Kovacs as a controversial author as well as Henry Jones, before his memorable turn in "Phyllis", is the clear evidence that Kovacs was an actor, who was very much at home with comedy, but could also handle drama quite well. This story is compelling, essentially a two-character study.

Sadly, this is not on DVD, which is a pity, because when it was shown on TVLand, the print seemed to be quite well-preserved. Well worth seeking out.


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