An evil man goes after a professor's color extracting device so he can destroy the world's greatest paintings. The professor, who is smitten by April, promises the machine to her.

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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April Dancer
...
...
...
B. Elzie Bubb
...
Quantum
Randy Kirby ...
Dick Crockett ...
Willie Goethe
Guy Way ...
Georgie Gounod
Milton Parsons ...
Waiter
Kelton Garwood ...
Poet
Lili Francks ...
Dancer (as Lili Clark)
Carol Wayne ...
Sheila
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Storyline

An evil man goes after a professor's color extracting device so he can destroy the world's greatest paintings. The professor, who is smitten by April, promises the machine to her.

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Action | Adventure

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Release Date:

27 December 1966 (USA)  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
The Situation Utterly Hopeless Affair
28 August 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This embarrassing, phoned-in entry illustrates why this spin off was such a disaster. The campy villain and his ridiculous evil plan feels more like a rejected BATMAN script. The show's attempt to capture the flavor of that series and the jaunty humor of THE AVENGERS fails miserably.

The cartoonish plot is a loopy variation on FAUST. Nerdy scientist Dr. Quantum (Tom Bosley) invents a light ray that can remove color from anything, turning objects white. He more or less sells his soul to eccentric millionaire B. Elzie Bubb, who dresses like Satan in a tux, red- lined cape, sinister goatee, etc. Bubb appears and vanishes in a cloud of smoke. (Is he really the Devil or just a magician using tricks?) At least Raymond Massey appears to be having fun hamming it up as Bubb.

April puts on nerd glasses and poses as Quantum's new assistant. She affects a strange accent, part snooty aristocrat, part working-class Bronx. For no good reason, Bubb also owns a Hell-themed nightclub, The Inferno. Hollywood's idea of an East Village beatnik joint with bongo-music, poetry reading, and trendy hipsters. Airing in December 1966, this was especially dated. Oh, and the waiters wear red devil costumes (subtle). Carol Wayne, in a purely decorative role, has two thankless scenes as a club patron. In the pointless scene where Mark searches Bubb's office, the odd snake candle holders from "The Addams Family" are seen.

The climax, with everyone running around in circles for five minutes, is only slightly less goofy than an episode of THE MONKEES. All sorts of random stuff is thrown together without any logic. The problem with this episode and the series as a whole lies in the lazy, hack writing and don't-give-a-crap production. No one cared about quality, and it shows in every frame. The poor actors, stuck with mediocre material and indifferent direction, just muddled through, week after week.


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