The Fugitive (1963–1967)
7.8/10
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Glass Tightrope 

Kimble risks his own freedom and life to help an elderly transient who is wrongly accused of murder when he's caught stealing a dead man's wallet.

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(teleplay), (story) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Angstrom
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Howard Pascoe
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Sgt. Lou Kronas
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Arthur Tibbetts
Tom Palmer ...
District Attorney
Warren Parker ...
Lewis
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Floyd (as Jud Taylor)
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Storyline

Kimble witnesses his boss, Martin Rowland, punching out a man in a club parking lot. After Mr. Rowland leaves, the man collapses and dies. Kimble phones the police to report the accident and when the police get there, they arrest an old transient who was hiding nearby with a stolen watch and wallet. Rowland and Kimble have a mutual respect, but Kimble keeps trying to anonymously push Rowland to confess to the fight and clear the old transient of the murder charge. Rowland actually does want to "do the right thing" but Rowland's wife doesn't care that the innocent old man might go to prison for murder because she knows that the fight was over her and she doesn't want any negative publicity.

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Release Date:

3 December 1963 (USA)  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jud Taylor who plays Kimble's co-worker Floyd would go on to direct Janssen's last TV appearance in "City in Fear" using the pseudonym Allan Smithee. The TV movie aired posthumously. See more »

Quotes

Martin C. Rowland: I imagine you've learned to move pretty fast, huh.
Dr. Richard Kimble: I've stayed alive.
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User Reviews

12/3/63: "The Glass Tightrope"
7 April 2015 | by See all my reviews

Here Leslie Nielsen plays an executive with a department store who owes his position to his marriage but has worked hard at it. A fellow executive who has been drinking too much begins to mock him as someone who has had success handed to him and Nielsen decks him in a parking lot. The man hits his head against a car and dies. A panicky Nielsen drives away, leaving him there. Richard Kimble, who has a job as a delivery man, is a witness. He comes over to help the man but when he realizes he's beyond help, he decides to leave to avoid the inevitable questions. A derelict comes upon the body and takes the guys' wallet but is caught by the police He's being held for what the police presume to be am murder. Kimble, feeling that he can't turn his back on an innocent man accused of murder, starts making anonymous phone calls to Nielsen urging him to turn himself in and save the guy. Nielsen's cynical wife figures out what has happened and urges Nielsen to let the derelict get blamed for the crime.

Another really good performance by Leslie Nielsen, who long before he became a comic figure in the "Airplane" and "Naked Gun" series, was one of the finest dramatic actors on television.


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