Foyle's War (2002–2015)
8.1/10
323
7 user

Invasion 

American troops arrive in Britain and the Corps of Engineers building an airstrip on a Hastings farm is met with resentment.

Director:

Writer:

(written and created by)
Reviews

Watch Now

From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Robert O'Sullivan ...
...
...
Susan Davies
...
Alan Carter
Andrew MacLachlan ...
Dr Mark Rogers
Peter Jonfield ...
Harold Grayson
...
...
Joe Farnetti
...
David Barrett
...
Will Grayson
...
Sergeant Paul Milner
...
Stan Davies
Jane Wood ...
Mary Davies
Jay Simpson ...
Sergeant Ian Brooke
...
Edit

Storyline

March 1942: The US Army Corps of Engineers arrives in Hastings to build an aerodrome and Foyle needs to calm a local farmer whose land has been requisitioned by the government. Foyle also gets hooked into giving a lecture to the American GIs on local customs. It all takes a more serious turn when a local barmaid, Susan Davies, is found strangled. She had been seeing one of the GIs and was pregnant, but was also involved selling illegal whiskey for her employer, Alan Carter. Meanwhile Sgt. Milner investigates the death of friend, Will Grayson, who died in a house fire. He had been drinking at Carter's pub but wasn't drunk when he left and Milner can't quite figure out why his friend didn't get out of the burning house in time. Finally, Sam gets unhappy news from boyfriend Andrew. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery | War

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 January 2006 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The sinking of the Reuben James mentioned by Captain Kieffer took place prior to America's entrance in the War with a loss of 115 lives. See more »

Goofs

On several occasions, military protocol was not followed by the American serviceman. In the real world, the behavior and disregard of basic regulations would have been dealt with severely. Some of the examples are, (1) the N.C.O.s did not salute the Captain on several occasions. (2) Foyle was invited by the Captain to speak to the NCO's regarding the local customs of the Brits. The sergeant spoke to Foyle with belligerence in a manner that would have caused embarrassment to his commanding officer.(3) When arriving into town, two privates were riding in the back of a jeep with the first sergeant driving and Captain in the front seat. The privates would have probably sent to the brig for making lewd comments and whistling at a young lady who at the time was giving the Captain directions. (4) Private Farnetti asked the Captain for permission to go into town while his immediate superior, the sergeant was in the room at the time. (5) During the inquiry of Private Taylor regarding his whereabouts during the murder, the private sat behind a table while the Captain stood. Their positions regarding sitting and standing would have been reversed in a military circumstance. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Boy at Roadside: [yells] The Jerries are here. The Jerries are here.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Foyle and the American invasion
3 November 2017 | by See all my reviews

Loved 'Foyle's War' and was immediately hooked when first getting into it. Love it even more now, on re-watches things that didn't quite make sense at first are clearer and things that were not noticed or appreciated before are and much admired. Everything that came over as brilliant on first viewings still are brilliant on re-watches.

All the previous episodes ranged between great to brilliant. "Invasion" is another example of a very good 'Foyle's War' episode but not quite great. The Americans are somewhat stereotypically portrayed agreed and the ending is not one of the surprising ones of the series, also guessed it before it happened (while also still finding it well done). Also felt that Jay Benedict overdid the gruffness and that the captain character was on the cartoonish side. As clichéd as this sounds, even when 'Foyle's War' was not at its best it was much better than a lot of shows at their weakest with none of the episodes being what one would deem "bad". Like with many 'Foyle's War' episodes, on re-watch there was much more appreciation had for how well established the character development, tone and themes are and things that didn't quite connect entirely at first made more sense on re-watches.

With that being said, "A War of Nerves" is an excellently executed episode otherwise. Have always admired the visual detail that went into 'Foyle's War' and how high quality the production values are, with beautiful costumes, the evocative way the characters are made up, the look of the houses and cars, pretty locations and authentic-looking scenery. The music is in keeping with the mood and doesn't overpower the drama while still making an impact.

Writing is intelligent, sophisticated and thought-provoking, establishing Foyle's personality with so much depth already and providing some tense and heart-tugging moments. The story has its issues, but is still compelling and never dull. It does require full attention as ever, and is mostly very clever and intriguing, pacing itself deliberately but as ever with a lot happening things don't feel dull and there are some nice twists and turns.

All the conflicts, social/ethical themes and how the period is portrayed are handled beautifully and tastefully and there is a real sense that war itself is a central character and its dark nature is explored very well here.

One thing that wasn't picked up by me but now is and admired hugely is the tackling of what was seen as truths but some really misconceptions and seeing British during the war in a new light. This was a bold move and dealt with a lot of honesty and tact. The background information is so well researched and is every bit as interesting as the mystery itself. The character tensions were also handled very well and added a lot of intrigue, despite the stereotypical characterisation the conflict between the British and the Americans is not that far from the truth.

Michael Kitchen is truly superb as Foyle, subtle, intensely determined, commanding and above all human. One of the most interesting television detectives there's ever been and Kitchen has rarely been better. Honeysuckle Weeks is charming and loyal, with some nice touches of subtle humour as ever, and Anthony Howell is wonderful.

Support acting is mostly solid, though few are outstanding. Phillip Jackson is very good though as always.

Overall, didn't wow me but hardly a clunker. 8/10 Bethany Cox


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 7 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

IMDb's Top 10 Stars of 2017

"The IMDb Show" connects the dots between IMDb's Top 10 Stars of 2017 and unwraps some of the most memorable and festive animated holiday specials.

Watch now