Four Star Playhouse (1952–1956)
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The Man on the Train 

William encounters an old acquaintance, John Dwerrihouse, on a train with 75,000 pounds. Only later did William learn that Dwerrihouse had disappeared four months earlier after embezzling 75,000 pounds from the train company.

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(screenplay), (screenplay)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
William Langford
...
Jeff Pender
...
Raikes
...
John Dwerrihouse
Walter Kingsford ...
Sir Charles
Reginald Sheffield ...
Inspector Blaney
Alex Frazer ...
Conductor
...
Allyson Pender (as Jean Willis)
Gordon Richards ...
Grimms
David Thursby ...
Bobby
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Storyline

William encounters an old acquaintance, John Dwerrihouse, on a train with 75,000 pounds. Only later did William learn that Dwerrihouse had disappeared four months earlier after embezzling 75,000 pounds from the train company.

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama

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Release Date:

15 January 1953 (USA)  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
A Jolly Good Ghost Story
8 January 2007 | by See all my reviews

I first saw this segment of "Four Star Playhouse" when I was about nine years old. I had a slight fever and was watching it while lying on the living room couch while my mom, dad, and grandma sat in chairs beside me. "The Man on the Train" (NOT "Man on a Train")scared the willies out of me at the time, and each time I think of it, I STILL get the willies.

David Niven plays a London businessman who has an extremely eerie encounter with a stranger on a train (with apologies to Alfred Hitchcock.) No blood, no gore, just chills galore.

Daniel Cohen, in his superb book "Railway Ghosts and Highway Horrors" masterfully retells this story. Whether Cohen meant his tale to be taken as a true tale of terror, or one of fiction is a matter of conjecture, but whichever way it is taken, as a tale, a re-telling of a real incident, or a superb TV show, "The Man on the Train" has to be one the greatest ghost stories of all time.

The TV version is available on budget DVD, under the title "Four Star Playhouse, Volume One."


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