During a convention in a large city, a visiting family consisting of a man, his wife and daughter checks into a hotel. When the girl leaves, the wife's incessant nagging pushes the man into... See full summary »

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(screenplay), (television play)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
Carl Ledbetter
...
Lt. Pannetti
...
June Ledbetter
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Mildred Ledbetter (as Rosemary De Camp)
Alan Dexter ...
Lt. Joe Lellers
George Eldredge ...
Dr. Granville
Walter Conrad ...
Ames
Bill Crandall ...
Lucas (as William W. Crandall)
...
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Storyline

During a convention in a large city, a visiting family consisting of a man, his wife and daughter checks into a hotel. When the girl leaves, the wife's incessant nagging pushes the man into a rage building for years, and he snaps. He's going to murder his wife with a long sharp piece of glass, police must go to extraordinary lengths to monitor when to rush in as he thrashes out every slight he's endured with her. Written by WesternOne

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music | Musical

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Release Date:

21 October 1954 (USA)  »

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(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Suspenseful moments, but weak
29 April 2016 | by See all my reviews

CONTAINS SPOILERS.

I saw this same story on a live 1952 Philco-Goodyear Playhouse. This time with more formidable actors, but the flaw is in the production. The story was about a man who suffers all his married life by his miserable, ever-nagging and demeaning wife. While visiting a hotel, she pushes too hard by threatening to reveal to his daughter her real birth status. He smashes a mirror and takes a long sword-like "segment" of broken glass and holds it to her throat, determined to murder her after he finishes his long list of unforgotten trespasses on his dignity.

Police monitor his movements with a remote TV camera with a Zoomar. A sniper nicks his shoulder and they break in to save the woman. Then, after all this insanity and terror, not to mention property destruction, she apologizes very very much, and he does too, AND THEY LET HIM GO! the wife and daughter promise how nice it'll be when they return home and they'll convert a room for his den, etc. Then, without thinking, she starts with small nagging again. The man (William Bendix) looks at us as we fade out. A second longer and he would have given us Chester Riley's payoff line, "What a revoltin' development THIS is!". And he'd be right. The Philco version was so much better, but this is the problem with Ford Theatre in general- They hate real drama and insist on happy endings, no matter what it does to the story. A classic Screen Gems treatment.


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