Family Theatre

That I May See (21 Nov. 1951)

TV Episode  |   |  Drama
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.8/10 from 10 users  
Reviews: 1 user

Add a Plot



0Check in
« Previous Episode | 6 of 13 Episodes | Next Episode »


Episode credited cast:
Jeffrey Lynn ...
Bartimeus the Beggar
Nestor Paiva ...
Man in the Crowd
Jesus (voice)
Otto Waldis
Houseley Stevenson
Walter Coy
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Irvin Ashkenazy
Frederic Berest ...
(as Fred Berest)
Nan Boardman


Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis






Release Date:

21 November 1951 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Spreading The Word Of What You've Seen
30 October 2007 | by (Buffalo, New York) – See all my reviews

Family Theatre was an early television anthology series produced under Roman Catholic Church auspices. This episode was the first I've ever seen of one of their productions and was broadcast today on the EWTN network. Ruth Hussey starred in it, as she apparently did in a few other episodes as the Virgin Mary.

But Mary's appearance in the story is only as a supporting character. The real star of this film is Jeffrey Lynn as Bartimus, the blind man cured in Jericho by Jesus who was on his way to Jerusalem at the time.

After the cure however Bartimius becomes rather full of himself. When Richard Hale, another blind man who wasn't lucky enough, to be around when Jesus was dispensing miracles tells Lynn he's getting arrogant, Lynn decides he might have something and Lynn resolves to go to Jerusalem and have some more words with Jesus.

We all know what happens to Jesus in Jerusalem, Lynn makes the acquaintance of Simon of Cyrene played by Raymond Burr, replete in full Othello makeup. They share their experiences of Jesus with each other and with Mary who comes to thank Simon for sharing the burden of the cross. And they vow to spread the word of the miracles they've witnessed and experienced.

This was early television, in black and white, and the production values are reflective of the time. Still it's a decent film of its type and played reverently by all those involved.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Duplicate entry on Jean Engstrom's page aponyny
Discuss That I May See (1951) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for: