Leroy's eight year old niece causes trouble when she imposes on her uncle and the faculty at the School of the Arts. Danny has trouble getting actors' equity when he finds out another Danny... See full summary »

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Stanley Beckerman
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Deborah Brighton ...
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Loretta Chandler ...
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Christopher Donlon (as Billy Hufsey)
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Charles A. Kelly ...
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Leroy's eight year old niece causes trouble when she imposes on her uncle and the faculty at the School of the Arts. Danny has trouble getting actors' equity when he finds out another Danny Amatullo is registered. Christopher struggles with the role of Hamlet. Written by Anonymous

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19 October 1985 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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John Carradine and Jack Carter
11 March 2014 | by (Youngstown,Ohio) – See all my reviews

"Leroy and the Kid" focuses on Leroy Johnson's relationship with his troublesome niece Tina (Caryn Ward), who insists that her father's gone straight as she gets her uncle into trouble with the faculty. Jack Carter plays Sidney Beckerman, who promises to back the latest show only if there's a part for little Tina, unprofessional but great for publicity. Meanwhile Danny's attempts to join Actors Equity are complicated by the surprising presence of another Danny Amatullo, played in his one standout sequence by legendary scene stealer John Carradine. In rare form, living at the YMCA, Carradine's Danny (dressed in a robe) confirms the lad isn't a bill collector ("if you're here for a paternity suit forget it, I haven't been near a woman for years!"), welcoming the newcomer into his room, which is adorned with show business paraphernalia, particularly the portrait of Shakespeare on the wall; young Danny explains how he won't be able to act unless he joins Equity ("that's not true, I've been in Equity 50 years and I've never been able to act!"). The old man insists on performing the death scene from "Cyrano" (as he faithfully does every day), the best death scene young Danny has ever seen (good enough to really appear dead). His memorable parting words- "you can acquire an Equity card, but you've got to be born with talent!" Even at age 79, John Carradine's smiling Shakespearean shows he still possesses 'the divine madness.'


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