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"Star Trek: Enterprise" These Are the Voyages... (TV Episode 2005) Poster

Trivia

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The logo patch worn on the right shoulder for the finale episode has 18 white stars around edge. These are in tribute to the 18 real-life astronauts that lost their lives during their missions.
Riker is reviewing the crew manifest of the Pegasus. The names and photos used are those of the production crew (Ronald D. Moore, Dawn Velazquez, etc.)
Brent Spiner has an uncredited cameo as Data, although only his voice is heard. Within the Holodeck, Riker portrays Chef, the cook on Enterprise (NX-01), who is almost never seen during the entire series.
The scene in Ten Forward of the Enterprise-D is taken from Star Trek: The Next Generation: Ménage à Troi (1990). Lwaxana Troi is substituted by William T. Riker in this scene, which is why he can be seen twice.
The holodeck, Ten Forward lounge, senior officer quarters and a stretch of Enterprise-D corridor were recreated for this show from scratch. The observation lounge set is mostly the original set restored to its form as seen in seasons 5-7, after having served, in a revamped form, as the Enterprise-E observation lounge in Star Trek: First Contact (1996) and Star Trek: Nemesis (2002). The turbolift Troi enters, however, was simply reused from the Enterprise-E without modification.
First Star Trek production to feature the USS Enterprise-D since Star Trek: Generations (1994).
Most of the behind-the-scenes production staff were able to sneak in brief cameo appearances (notably during the final scene at the assembly) for the finale episode.
Several references are made to Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987). In the engine room, Trip tells Reed that he never thought their time on Enterprise would end. Reed responds by saying, "All good things...". This was the title of the series finale for TNG, Star Trek: The Next Generation: All Good Things... (1994). Also, in Archer's cabin, Trip and Archer are enjoying a sip of whiskey, and Archer raises his glass and says, "Here's to the next generation."
This series finale took several days longer to shoot than a regular episode.
The title is from the narration from the openings of the first Star Trek (1966) and Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) series.
This is the first and only time in Star Trek canon that the Holodeck's "Objective Mode" is used by name, which allows users to watch events without actually participating in them. The mode has been used before in other series but never referred to by name.
This takes place in 2370.
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The stardate given (47457.1) is the same as the stardate used in Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Pegasus (1994).
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This is the only Star Trek series finale where none of the regular crew of the series appears, but rather, their holographic copies. It is, however, not the first episode to do this; in Star Trek: Voyager: Living Witness (1998), only holographic representations of the Voyager crew are seen, and even the doctor turns out to be a copy of his original hologram.
At the 50th anniversary "Star Trek" convention in Las Vegas in August 2016, fans voted this the worst episode of the "Star Trek" franchise.
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The non-holodeck events Riker and Troi discuss relate to the Next Generation episode "The Pegasus". "These Are the Voyages" becomes a backstory to the events of "Pegasus" showing how Riker comes to his decision to disobey an order from his former CO by telling Picard the truth about the Pegasus.
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With their appearances in this episode, Jonathan Frakes (Commander William T. Riker) and Marina Sirtis (Counselor Deanna Troi) have both played the same character in three different live-action "Star Trek" series: Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987), Star Trek: Voyager (1995) and Star Trek: Enterprise (2001). The only other actors to do so are Armin Shimerman (Quark), John de Lancie (Q), Michael Ansara (Kang), Richard Poe (Gul Evek) and Mark Allen Shepherd (Morn).
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The ceremony witnessed at the end of the episode is not the signing of the Federation Charter, as is commonly believed, but rather the signing of the charter ratifying the Coalition of Planets, which soon leeds to the formation of the United Federation of Planets. This is evidenced by Troi's remark to Riker that "this alliance will give birth to the Federation."
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The holodeck in this episode creates a holographic 22nd century Starfleet uniform over Riker's 24th century uniform. In previous appearances, the Enterprise-D's holodeck is never shown to have this capacity (the Enterprise-E does), and crew are frequently seen dressed in character while on their way to and from the holodeck. When they are interrupted, they sometimes resume their duties while in costume as seen in TNG: "The Big Goodbye", "Elementary, Dear Data" and Star Trek Generations.
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In this episode, Riker and Troi visit the holographic re-creation of the Captain's ready room aboard the NX-class Enterprise. There, Riker remarks that the room is smaller than the Enterprise-D's brig. Riker ends up in that room at the end of "The Pegasus", although Picard releases him at the very end.
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First and only episode where crew names (first initial and last name, except for T'Pol) appear on their uniforms.
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With the addition of this episode, Jonathan Frakes has appeared in all of the live-action Star Trek spin-offs. In The Next Generation and Voyager's "Death Wish", he featured as Commander William T. Riker. In DS9's "Defiant", he reprised his role from TNG's "Second Chances" as Thomas Riker.
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The Enterprise-D has all three of its impulse engines illuminated at all times. In TNG it normally had only the impulse engine on the stardrive section illuminated, with saucer engines used only when the saucer was separated.
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Porthos is the only character, besides the regulars, to appear in both this episode and the pilot "Broken Bow".
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This is the final episode of Star Trek: Enterprise. It is the first series finale since "The Counter-Clock Incident" that is not a feature-length episode.
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This episode marked the end of a constant Star Trek series production run that started with the beginning of Star Trek: The Next Generation in 1987.
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The 22nd century events of this episode actually take place on the holodeck of the USS Enterprise-D in 2370, during the episode TNG: "The Pegasus".
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This episode marks the first appearance of a Starfleet holodeck since VOY: "Renaissance Man".
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This episode was reported to have been written as a possible finale for the show's third season, had the series not been renewed. According to Enterprise producer Mike Sussman, however, while the idea for this episode was conceived during that year, the episode was not written until season 4.
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As mentioned by Archer, Rigel X was also the first place Enterprise visited in "Broken Bow".
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The only exterior shot of the NX-01 Enterprise in this episode appears in the closing montage.
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This episode establishes the NX-01 still exists in the 24th century within a Starfleet museum.
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This episode contains the first use of remastered footage from TNG, specifically from the episode "Ménage à Troi", for use during the scene in Ten Forward. Also, unlike the remastered collection of TNG which was released in the 4:3 aspect ratio, this footage was shown in 16:9.
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This episode features five actors who previously appeared in a Star Trek finale: Majel Barrett appeared in TOS: "Turnabout Intruder" and TNG: "All Good Things...", Jonathan Frakes, Marina Sirtis and Brent Spiner also all appeared in TNG: "All Good Things..." and Jeffrey Combs appeared in DS9: "What You Leave Behind". Additionally, William Shatner ("Turnabout Intruder", "The Counter-Clock Incident") and Patrick Stewart ("All Good Things...") appear through archive voice-overs at the end of the episode.
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In addition to the appearances of Frakes and Sirtis and Spiner's voice cameo, background actor David Keith Anderson appears in Ten Forward. Anderson was a frequent (uncredited) background actor in Star Trek: The Next Generation, including "The Pegasus"; his character was named in other episodes as Ensign Armstrong. Anderson also served as a stand-in for Anthony Montgomery.
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Allan Kroeker (director) had directed the final episodes of Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise. In addition to those three series finales, he has directed eight season finales in total. He has also directed episodes of Ronald D. Moore's Battlestar Galactica, Wonderfalls, Tru Calling, Jake 2.0, Firefly, The Twilight Zone, Andromeda, Roswell, Charmed, Earth: Final Conflict, William Shatner's TekWar, Grimm, Defiance, Alphas, Covert Affairs, Bones, Pushing Daisies and Supernatural.
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The attendants at the ceremony seated around Sato, Reed and Mayweather consist of behind-the-scenes personnel dressed in Starfleet or civilian garb. This mirrors the final episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, in which various cast and crew members made cameos as customers at Vic's lounge during the celebration of the Federation's victory in the Dominion War.
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The series pilot, "Broken Bow", begins with the line "... where no man has gone before", spoken by a young Jonathan Archer. This episode, the series finale, ends with the line "... where no man has gone before", also spoken by Archer.
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After the captain saves Tucker's life, the engineer thanks Archer by referring to him as "boss". "Broken Bow" is the only other episode in the series in which that word is used. In "Broken Bow", a crewman named Fletcher offered Tucker a seat in the mess hall, but the engineer continued through the room, stating, "Dinner with the boss tonight".
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The second NX-class starship, Columbia NX-02, had columns installed on the bridge that Enterprise did not have at the time. In this episode, similar columns can be seen on Enterprise's bridge.
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In this episode it is revealed that Shran had a daughter with Jhamel, an Aenar female whom the Andorian met in "The Aenar".
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Epaulets are introduced in this episode, similar to those shown in "In a Mirror, Darkly".
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Near the end of the episode, T'Pol tries to straighten Archer's collar before the ceremony. In Star Trek: Insurrection, a similar scene shows Dr. Beverly Crusher attempting to help Captain Picard with his collar before a meeting with an Evora delegation. T'Pol also similarly tries to adjust Archer's attire in "Fallen Hero".
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Previous Enterprise episodes referenced in this episode are "Broken Bow", "First Flight", "The Xindi", "Harbinger", "The Forgotten", "Zero Hour", and "The Aenar". In a more subtle reference, Trip's figure of Frankenstein's monster which T'Pol examines is an allusion to the second season episode "Horizon", in which Trip persuades T'Pol to watch various Frankenstein movies with him.
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Riker's decision at the end of the episode is different from that seen in the episode "Pegasus". In "These Are the Voyages...", Riker leaves the holodeck, full of resolve, to speak with Captain Picard about Pressman and the illegal cloaking device. In the original version of the "Pegasus", however, Riker only admits to what he and Pressman did after he is backed into a corner when the Enterprise is trapped inside an asteroid. It is possible, however, that the Pegasus was located before Riker could speak with Picard.
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The scene in which Archer and T'pol embrace and Archer climbs the steps to enter the auditorium to deliver his speech was the last scene (filmed on March 5th 2005) of any Star Trek series to be filmed. (Note: Jonathan Frakes and Marina Sirtis had to return on March 9th to complete several greenscreen shots).
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In response to fan criticisms, series producer Manny Coto stated that he personally considered this episode to be a coda rather than the true finale of the series. Both he and fellow series producer Mike Sussman consider the two-part story "Demons" and "Terra Prime" that precede this installment to be the actual finale of the Enterprise storyline.
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Since the introduction of Section 31 into the Star Trek lore, many fans have speculated that it was involved with the Pegasus experiments. This episode may confirm this. Riker has a line in Troi's quarters where he says the cloak was developed by "a secret group in Starfleet Security".
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Jeffery Combs has the distinction of portraying eight different characters on Star Trek series. He has played the roles of Brunt, Weyoun, Shran, Tiron, Kevin Mulkahey, Penk, Krem, and a holosuite guest. He is one of only five actors to play seven or more different characters in the Star Trek franchise, the others being Randy Oglesby, J.G. Hertzler, Vaughn Armstrong and Thomas Kopache. Coincidentally, Combs has appeared on Star Trek with all four of those actors.
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Rick Berman described this episode as a "valentine to the fans".
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This episode marks the final contribution to the Star Trek franchise from Rick Berman. (Brannon Braga later wrote the story for the comic book series Star Trek: The Next Generation - Hive.)
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The long blaster rifles carried by the criminals who board the Enterprise, and accost Archer and Tucker, are repainted Star Wars toys of the Imperial DLT-19 Heavy Blaster Rifle.
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According to Rick Berman, this episode would have been the fourth season finale even if the series had been picked up for a fifth season. He did state, however, that if the series had been renewed, Tucker would still have been killed off because the episode flashed forward in time and so when the show came back for the new season, Tucker would still have been alive. In later interviews, Berman said that if the show had been renewed, several story elements, including Tucker's death, would likely have been changed.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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