The staff of the local Los Angeles Country Animal Control department office assist Fire Station 51 and Rampart Hospital on some animal related emergencies.

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(created by), (created by) (as R.A. Cinader) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Barney 'Doc' Coolidge
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Ofcr. II Les Taylor
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Ofcr. Dave Gordon
Gary Crosby ...
Supervisor Walt Marsh
Rose Ann Deel ...
Patty Burns (as Rose Ann Zecker)
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Mrs. Quincy (as Ruth Mc Devitt)
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Rosa Bernardi
Stephanie Steele ...
Sandy
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Officer Garcia
Ron Pinkard ...
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Storyline

Roy and Johnny respond to Bernardi's Market, called by the owner's wife who believes her husband was attacked by a maniac with a knife. Johnny investigates and comes face to face with 500 pounds of mortality: a roaring tiger. Roy asks the dispatcher to call Animal Control. Officer Dave Gordon (Mark Harmon) recognizes a Bengal tiger when he sees one; and his partner, Les Taylor, recognizes she is 450 pounds. A local man is operating an unauthorized zoo and mistreating animals. LA Animal Control is concerned with the animals' health; they want to tranquilize, not neutralize. At County Animal Shelter 2, Supervisor Walt Marsh, works with one vet, Dr. Barney Coolidge, and an assistant, trying to "catch and release" various types of wildlife displaced by modern civilization; often, they must also treat wounded or sick animals. Gordon and Taylor meet the paramedics again, trying to help an old man and his little disabled granddaughter who lost her pet Pygmy goat, William, in the brushfire. ... Written by LA-Lawyer

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1 March 1975 (USA)  »

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(Technicolor)|

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first (and only) time the Rampart paramedic communications station is shown to be on wheels (Starting in Season 5, the equipment was placed in a separate room). See more »

Goofs

When the paramedics arrive at the grocery store it is dark outside. When the animal control officers arrive it is daylight. When the tiger gets onto the roof of the building it is dark once again. At the end of the rescue the sun is just rising. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Kelly Brackett: [while operating on a goat] Clamp off that bleeder.
Dr. Joe Early: This one?
Dr. Kelly Brackett: What did you do, sleep through your animal medicine?
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User Reviews

 
Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright
19 September 2015 | by (Flyover country, United States) – See all my reviews

It's not good form to comment on other reviewers but I make a brief exception here. It's one thing to dislike something for articulable reasons, but quite another to characterize it as 'creepy' (one of the most egregious but casually tossed around deprecations made these days) without stating why. For me it says more about the commentator than the target.

Not to mention that reducing Harmon's role as a 'dog catcher' illustrated the point of the episode! That said, this episode was formulaic, predictable and looked very much like a pilot for a spin-off. Nevertheless I found it fun and informative. Though I love them, Jack Webb's public service shows tend to be clunky in dialog but this one was better than usual. It was corny, but when the injured firefighter at Rampart gave up his place in line, so to speak, for treatment of the goat, I gave him my applause.

If nothing else, watch this one for the by-play between all the ER professionals, Brackett and Dixie in particular. David Huddleston makes a great case for DVMs as well, and humanizes Brackett in the process.


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