A known extortionist claims he is innocent of recent charges. Gannon and Friday interrogate him about different incidents, and then bring out a surprise device which proves his guilt.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Watch Now

From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
...
...
George Fox

What You Missed at San Diego Comic-Con 2017

From the madness of the convention floor to the emotional panel reveals and star-studded interviews, catch up on all the unforgettable sights from Comic-Con.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

Edit

Storyline

A known extortionist claims he is innocent of recent charges. Gannon and Friday interrogate him about different incidents, and then bring out a surprise device which proves his guilt.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Edit

Details

Language:

Release Date:

22 February 1969 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Goofs

When Friday hands George Fox a photo of his alleged accomplice, Fox holds a cigar in one hand. In the next shot, a close up of the photo, it is held by two hands, with no cigar present. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Hey, you guys, it's stuffy in here.
7 April 2012 | by (Deming, New Mexico, USA) – See all my reviews

John Sebastian is a rich extortionist named Fox who shows up late for an appointment with Friday and Gannon. It's raining outside and the entire show takes place in the interrogation room. I wanted to throw open a window and get some air.

At first, Fox is puffed up and derisive towards the two officers. He's wearing a colorful stiff suit with a boutonniere and he makes pronouncements like, "You guys ain't got nothing on me. Why I make in an hour what it takes you cops ten years to make, get me?" The wily cops let him spout off for ten minutes or so before they begin to play a tape-recorded conversation in which one of Fox's minions is frightened out of his wits and begs the mark to fork over the dough, otherwise they'll both be spanked. "Part One," says Friday.

Fox is a little shaken but he blusters on, getting angrier and more desperate. "Part Two," says Friday, playing back the portion of the tape on which Fox himself threatens to off the victim. "That ain't my voice!", Fox protests. Then Friday and Gannon whip out a voice print and tell him that no two voices are alike and they can be matched just like fingerprints. That's not exactly true but it's enough of a lie to make Fox slump in his chair and give it up.

What makes the series interesting is the variety of odd balls and straight people that Friday and Gannon bump into as they follow the villain's spoor. Here, with only one villain -- and him a stereotype and not doing a good job of enacting the role -- there's not much to go on, and the show winds up looking like a game of ping pong with the heavy's score getting lower and lower for half an hour.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?