Dragnet 1967 (1967–1970)
7.0/10
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The Phony Police Racket 

Con artists convince business owners to pay for an ad for their business in a police magazine and in return, they receive a card which allows them to not have to pay for police tickets. The... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Sergeant Joe Friday
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Officer Bill Gannon
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Preston C. Densmore
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Wesley Hundorn
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Jennifer Salt
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Officer Reed
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Capt. Lambert
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Paul G. Fremont
Victor Millan ...
Salvador Cabo
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Axel Varney
Don Ross ...
Bart Emerson
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Storyline

Con artists convince business owners to pay for an ad for their business in a police magazine and in return, they receive a card which allows them to not have to pay for police tickets. The magazine is not real, and the cards have no value. Written by Bernie

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Crime | Drama | Mystery

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TV-G
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Release Date:

7 December 1967 (USA)  »

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(Technicolor)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kent McCord makes an appearance as "Officer Reed", almost a year before he would take the role of another officer named Reed on Jack Webb's Adam-12 (1968). See more »

Goofs

Kent McCord makes an appearance as Officer Reed, a year before Adam-12 premiered. This episode causes a character conflict established in the "Adam-12" pilot, where Reed is established to have only been on the job for three weeks. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Dragnet 1968: The Phony Police Racket
17 December 2011 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Los Angeles citizens are being swindled by con artists posing as members of a police organization, giving those duped cards with "NALE" on them, feeding them falsities about showing their card to law enforcement expecting to get away with minor tickets and other small penalties if they purchase an ad in a specific newsletter/magazine (a magazine that doesn't really exist) supposedly sponsoring a "widows and orphans" club. So Sgt Friday and partner Bill Gannon (Jack Webb and Harry Morgan) go after those responsible for this bunco scheme that continues to gain new victims. The plot is simple as that. Not an overly complex story to follow and the results are unsurprising. Not sure what it was, but this particular episode of Dragnet 1968 just wasn't that exciting or fulfilling in any way and had this "been there, done that" feel I never could shake. Sure seeing Friday and Gannon nail the bad guys is always gratifying, but bunco-themed episodes all kind of operate on the same pattern: ordinary citizens are being tricked by con artists, our cops listen to testimony from victims, and they go undercover, posing as potential new dupes, only to catch their suspects during the big salespitch/scheme, arresting them when the criminals fall into the trap. Part of this episode's charm is the numerous colorful victims who testify to Friday and Gannon about how they were conned, truly expecting to get away with penalties by flashing a card. Seeing one travel agency businessman attempt to get out of a ticket for giving Friday and Gannon evidence needed for their investigation and a loudly contentious bar owner who wholly believes all of the police are in on the swindling racket provide highlights that keep "The Phony Police Racket" from being a total hum-drum experience. I think the real personality of this show is the supporting parts/characters who enter investigations conducted by our plainclothes detectives, their opinions, lives, difficulties, and varying status in the city kind of inject life into what could be just a solemn, by-the-numbers police procedural.


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