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"Doctor Who" The Parting of the Ways (TV Episode 2005) Poster

(TV Series)

(2005)

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (4)
When Jack kisses Rose and the Doctor goodbye, John Barrowman made a special effort to kiss both actors in exactly the same way... except on one take, when he kissed Billie Piper as usual, then said his line to Christopher Eccleston, started the kiss, and didn't stop until they fell on the floor. (Source: John Barrowman on the DVD commentary)
The street corner at which the TARDIS reappears after being sent back to 2005 is the same street corner where Rose's father was originally struck by a car and killed in the opening of Doctor Who: Father's Day (2005) prior to Rose altering the circumstances of his death.
The first appearance of David Tennant as the Doctor.
David Tennant's portion of the regeneration scene was actually filmed much later than Christopher Eccleston's, and without the presence of Billie Piper. Tennant's segment was recorded with him speaking to a piece of sticky tape indicating Piper's eyeline and then edited into the broadcast version.
Russell T. Davies wrote an alternative climax in which the Doctor and Rose actually head to the planet Barcelona, with Rose unknowingly on the verge of death due to her exposure to the time vortex. It was planned that this ending would still be recorded, at least partly to serve as a red herring. This ending has not been released to the public.
This episode was watched by 6.91 million viewers on its original transmission, winning a 43.96% audience share.
Initially, the Controller survived into this episode to provide the Doctor with someone to talk to, until Russell T. Davies decided it would be more effective to have him converse with the Emperor Dalek instead.
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The reason Jack was left behind was to explore the effect of the regeneration on Rose. Russell T. Davies felt that because of his 51st century background, Jack would just take it in his stride.
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In an acting master class at the Theatre Royal Haymarket in July 2011, Christopher Eccleston expanded the reasons for his leaving the show. He cited creative differences with "the senior people" on the production and stated he did not like "the culture" of working on the production.
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This episode takes place in 200100 and 2006.
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This was the first episode in this series which was not given a press screening prior to the broadcast. Radio Times stated, "No preview tape was available for this episode." The episode was, however, screened for BAFTA on 15 June 2005.
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Rose's actions create a predestination paradox. The words "Bad Wolf" tell her to try to get back to the Doctor, and her doing so gives her the ability to leave the words through time as messages to herself, which she then does. Although it can be argued that the phrase "Bad Wolf" originates with the Badwolf Corporation, it can also be argued that she somehow prompted the creation of the phrase through her powers in the first place, thereby also introducing an ontological paradox. Ontological paradoxes were explored in Doctor Who: Blink (2007), where the Doctor explains that space-time is not strictly cause-to-effect,[20] and serve as a major plot device in Doctor Who: Time Crash (2007). The Doctor himself moves in a fictitious five-dimensional setting (The Space Museum, 1964), and perhaps a six-dimensional setting (Inferno, 1970).
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The guns used by Jack and the Game Station people are Heckler and Koch G36Ks.
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Although he is soon brought back to life, Jack's death in this episode makes him the first companion to die since Kamelion in Doctor Who: Planet of Fire: Part Four (1984).
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The Doctor's farewell recording to Rose - "Have a good life ..." - is quoted in the lyrics of "Song for Ten", featured in the next full episode, Doctor Who: The Christmas Invasion (2005).
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Jack kisses the Doctor affectionately on the mouth (after kissing Rose) before going off to fight the Daleks. This is the first same-sex kiss featured in the Doctor Who franchise. Another occasion could be that of Madame Vastra and Jenny in Doctor Who: Deep Breath (2014), although this was more so out of survival than affection.
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This episode marks the last time the lead character is identified as "Doctor Who" in the closing credits until Doctor Who: The Next Doctor (2008). Beginning with Doctor Who: The Christmas Invasion (2005), the credit reverts to "The Doctor" as it had been during the last nine years of the original series. This episode is the only occasion in which David Tennant is credited as "Doctor Who" until Doctor Who: The Next Doctor (2008).
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Submerging the Dalek mutant puppet in the Emperor's water tank destroyed its inner mechanics. As a result, the puppet would not be used again until Doctor Who: The Stolen Earth (2008)/Doctor Who: Journey's End (2008). A CGI version of the mutant was later used in Doctor Who: Daleks in Manhattan (2007).
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This is the third regeneration episode to credit both actors playing the Doctor, the first two being Doctor Who: Logopolis: Part Four (1981) and Doctor Who: The Caves of Androzani: Part Four (1984). The fourth occasion would be Doctor Who: The End of Time: Part Two (2010). Unlike the first two, and like the fourth, the incoming actor is the last actor to be credited. Doctor Who (1996) also credited both actors who played the Doctor, but did so in the opening credits and without listing their roles specifically.
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The BBC produced a documentary entitled Doctor Who: 30 Years in the Tardis (1993), which ended with several scenes showing how modern-day special effects could be applied to "new" Doctor Who production. One of these scenes shows many Daleks hovering together. Whether by accident or intent, this episode includes several scenes that strongly resemble this "what if" scenario.
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As the last episode of the series, there is no "Next Time" trailer at the end of the episode, merely a message that "Doctor Who will return in The Christmas Invasion".
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The only characters who do not die in this episode are Rose, Jackie and Mickey, who are all either main or recurring characters. Every guest character dies, along with the Ninth Doctor and Jack, though the latter is revived shortly afterwards. As a result, this is the first episode to kill off the entire guest cast since Horror of Fang Rock 18 years before, an act that would not be repeated again until Doctor Who: The Doctor's Wife (2011).
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The Doctor also met a giant Dalek Emperor and some black-domed Dalek Guards while in his second incarnation in "The Evil of the Daleks.
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The Ninth Doctor's pre-regeneration statement, "I mean it's a bit dodgy this process, you never know what you're gonna end up with", echoes the Fifth Doctor's post-regeneration statement in Doctor Who: Castrovalva: Part One (1982), "That's the trouble with regeneration, you never quite know what you're going to get".
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The Ninth Doctor looks at his right hand before he regenerates. His next incarnation does the exact same thing twice.
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This is the first known time that the Doctor's kisses have had an effect on humans beyond the act itself. In this case, the Doctor removes the time vortex energy from Rose by kissing her. In the next, he imparts traces of his alien DNA to Martha Jones. (_Smith and Jones_) The Doctor and Donna Noble later kiss, but in that instance the Doctor is the one affected, as the kiss was a catalyst for an antidote to poison - Donna kissed him to give his system a shock. (Doctor Who: The Unicorn and the Wasp (2008)).
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The Daleks have overcome their weakness to bastic bullets, which previously appeared in "Revelation of the Daleks" in 1984.
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One of the Daleks has a cutting tool instead of a plunger, as seen in Doctor Who: The Ambush (1964) and Doctor Who: Planet of the Daleks: Episode Three (1973).
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Humans have previously been converted to Daleks on Necros by Davros in Revelation of the Daleks.
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Rose seems to dislike Lynda judging on how she reacts to The Doctor and Lynda's interactions.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The last appearance of Christopher Eccleston as the Doctor.
Christopher Eccleston's departure was meant to be kept secret so that the regeneration would come as surprise. However, the news broke early in the series, so the impact was lost.
Series 1 contained an underlying story arc about the meaning and identity of Bad Wolf, with each episode containing several references to the name. In this episode, Rose sees dozens of Bad Wolf graffiti, which lead her to realizing that she is the Bad Wolf, and uses the words to always lead her back to The Doctor.
This is the first time the Doctor, or any Time Lord for that matter, is seen regenerating standing up, as previous Doctors collapsed before regenerating. This would later become the norm.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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