When a boy is hit by a car and thus becomes in dire need of surgery, his parents refuse to allow it for religious reasons. The Prestons, who are representing the young woman who hit the boy, work desperately to find a judge who will overrule the parents and allow surgery.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Evans Evans ...
Eleanor Dunn
...
Mr. Morton
...
Helen Donaldson
...
Don Simmons
Peggy Feury ...
Mrs. Morton
Valerie Cossart ...
Judge Rita Dohemy
Robert Pastene ...
Dr. Fields
Kermit Murdock ...
DA Larkin
Sally Gracie ...
Mrs. Costello
Don McHenry ...
Judge Green
Benedict Herrman ...
Shoeshine Boy (as Brad Herrman)
Jim Boles ...
Court Clerk
Charles Braswell ...
Police Lieutenant
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Storyline

When a boy is hit by a car and thus becomes in dire need of surgery, his parents refuse to allow it for religious reasons. The Prestons, who are representing the young woman who hit the boy, work desperately to find a judge who will overrule the parents and allow surgery.

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Drama

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Release Date:

4 November 1961 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Science v. Faith
1 September 2016 | by See all my reviews

The story involves a boy's injury after an auto accident, but his parents are against surgery because their religion forbids it, he dies soon after.

The flighty girl that caused the accident while driving drunk is early on established as a low intellect, emotional child-woman whom we can freely pity and care about, whereas the parents are rigid, and stone faced, holding to their extreme dogma that all but insures the boy's death. (The name of their church is a made-up denomination.)

A shining hero in the form of the state appears, overriding the parent's stupid superstitions and the boy does get worked on, but maybe too much time was lost arguing with the primitives, and death comes.

Later in court, a doctor testifies that possibly operating in time might not have saved the lad's life. So the medical profession, and science, is off the hook. Then it comes out that the prayer-obsessed father made the boy get out of his bed multiple times to pray, rupturing the wounds and that, unsubtley suggests that religion killed the kid. The drunk driver is off the hook too, and gets a slap on the wrist. The lesson here is, I take it, The world would be a better place if we could do away with religious faith just like we can with parental rights.


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