IMDb > "Daniel Boone" Ken-Tuck-E (1964)

"Daniel Boone" Ken-Tuck-E (1964)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.5/10   24 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Borden Chase (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Ken-Tuck-E on IMDbPro.
Original Air Date:
24 September 1964 (Season 1, Episode 1)
Plot:
Daniel Boone is commissioned by George Washington to build a fort in the territory of Kentucky. The... See more » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Action packed first episode See more (1 total) »

Cast

 (Episode Cast) (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Fess Parker ... Daniel Boone

Albert Salmi ... Yadkin

Ed Ames ... Mingo

Patricia Blair ... Rebecca Boone

Veronica Cartwright ... Jemima Boone

Darby Hinton ... Israel Boone

George Lindsey ... Wigeon

Robert F. Simon ... Blackfish (as Robert Simon)
Gregory Morton ... Brayton
Chuck Roberson ... Dark Panther
Bobby Horan ... Nathan Carr

Phil Chambers ... Macawner

Stephen Courtleigh ... Washington

Arch Johnson ... Judson
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Emile Avery ... Settler (uncredited)
Eddie Eagle ... Narrator, DVD Trailer (uncredited)

Bill Hart ... Indian (uncredited)
Billy McCoy ... Settler (uncredited)

Joe Phillips ... Settler (uncredited)
Phil Schumacher ... Settler (uncredited)

Episode Crew
Directed by
George Marshall 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Borden Chase  written by

Produced by
Aaron Rosenberg .... executive producer
Bernard Wiesen .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Lionel Newman 
 
Cinematography by
Carl E. Guthrie (director of photography) (as Carl Guthrie)
Paul Ivano (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Louis R. Loeffler  (as Louis Loeffler)
 
Art Direction by
Jack Senter 
Jack Martin Smith 
 
Set Decoration by
William F. Calvert  (as Bill F. Calvert)
Walter M. Scott 
 
Production Management
Gaston Glass .... production manager
William Self .... executive in charge of production
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jack Gertsman .... assistant director
George Marshall Jr. .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Ralph Hickey .... sound effects editor (as Ralph B. Hickey)
 
Music Department
Leonard A. Engel .... music editor
Vera Matson .... composer: theme music
Lionel Newman .... composer: theme music
Lionel Newman .... conductor
 
Transportation Department
Chris Haynes .... driver (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Runtime:
USA:60 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The title of Episode One, Ken-tuk-E, is an early pronunciation of the territory of Kentucky, meaning "Dark and Bloody Ground." During the episode Mingo tells Daniel that his tribe calls it Ken-tuk-y, which Daniel says means "The Promised Land"See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When Mingo and Daniel try to get away after being captured, Mingo goes to roll down a hill while his hands are bound behind his back. As the stunt man takes his first barrel roll you can see him brace himself against the ground with his left hand. Then in the next cut he's rolling down with his hands behind his back.See more »
Soundtrack:
Fare Thee WellSee more »

FAQ

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7 out of 7 people found the following review useful.
Action packed first episode, 23 March 2014
Author: gordonl56 from Canada

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

DANIEL BOONE – Ken-Tuck-E – 1964

This is the first episode of the long running 1964-70 series about the life of American frontiersman and explorer, Daniel Boone. The lead is played by Fess Parker. Also in the mix are Albert Salmi, Ed Ames, Patricia Blair, Veronica Cartwright and Darby Hinton.

Boone (Fess Parker) is sent off to explore for a site for a possible fort in the new area known as Ken-Tuck-E. Parker, along, with his pal, Albert Salmi, hope to make contact with the native tribes. They would like to make a peace treaty. They know that a possible war with the British could be soon happening.

They reach the area and are soon in a spot of trouble. They stop one group of Indians from killing a member of another tribe. The man they save, Ed Ames, turns out to be quite the fellow. He is a Cherokee warrior named, Mingo, who had, as a boy been taken to England. He had been given an Oxford education before returning to help his people.

After sending Salmi back to Virginia, Parker and Ames are set upon by another group of Shawnee warriors and captured. Ames manages to escape by leaping over a cliff edge. Parker is brought before the Chief, Robert Simon. Simon likes the cut of the man's jib and decides to adopt Boone into his tribe. He even gives him a bride.

To cut to the quick, Ames shows and helps Parker kidnap Simon as a hostage. This is done in order to stop an attack by Simon's warriors on Boone's frontier fort. Shots and tomahawks are exchanged before Simon decides he would rather have peace than war. Boone and Simon agree to a treaty. Simon will also pass the word to the other tribes that there is no need for war.

An awful lot of plot is thrown at the viewer in this one. It is more or less used to introduce the main characters to the audience. Having said that, the episode itself, moves along very well under the control of former big screen director, George Marshall.

Journeyman helmsman, Marshall, cranked out more than a few good films during his, 1916 to 1969 tenure on the big screen. The most well-known of his films would be, SHOW THEM NO MERCY, DESTRY RIDES AGAIN, WHEN THE DALTONS RODE, Texas, GHOST BREAKERS, THE FOREST RANGERS, NEVER A DULL MOMENT, THE GUNS OF FORT PETTICOAT, SAVAGE, DESTRY, THE MATING GAME and the noir standard, THE BLUE DAHLIA.

The story and screenplay are by long time Hollywood writer, Borden Chase. His work includes, THE MAN FROM Colorado, DESTROYER, MONTANA, TYCOON, RED RIVER, THE FIGHTING SEEBEES, BEND OF THE RIVER, IRONMAN, RAILS INTO LARAMIE, VERA CRUZ, BACKLASH, THE FAR COUNTRY, NIGHT PASSAGE and WINCHESTER 73.

There is plenty of outdoors shot film work here with top cinematographer Carl Guthrie at the controls. His work is featured in the film noir, BACKFIRE, FLAXY MARTIN, CRY WOLF, THE BIG PUNCH, THIS SIDE OF THE LAW, UNDERCOVER GIRL, CAGED, STORM WARNING and HIGHWAY 301. He also lensed a few decent westerns like, FORT BOWIE, YELLOWSTONE KELLY, QUANTEZ, FORT MASSACRE and SHOOT-OUT AT MEDICINE BEND.

All in all, a pretty good episode with some pretty good production values. A good story, and plenty of action keep the viewer entertained.

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