6.8/10
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3 user

The Case of the Lively Ghost 

A phony spiritualist believes she's truly summoned a real ghost.

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(script), (based on "The Department of Queer Complaints" by) (as Carter Dickson)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Colonel March Of Scotland Yard
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Inspector Ames
Virginia Downing ...
Madame Richter
Genine Graham ...
Victoria
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Terry Fortescue / Henry Fortescue
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Mrs. Fortescue
Tristan Rawson ...
Lord Hibbing
Susan Buret ...
Nurse
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Storyline

A phony spiritualist believes she's truly summoned a real ghost.

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Genres:

Crime | Drama

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Release Date:

18 October 1954 (UK)  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Fortune tellers and ghosts
13 September 2011 | by See all my reviews

Episode 7, "The Case of the Lively Ghost" sees a queer complaint from Madame Richter (Virginia Downing), a phony spiritualist who believes she actually summoned the ghost of Henry Fortescue, sent to Canada by his grieving mother (Dulcie Bowman), who recently was delivered the sad news behind his death by a man named Fenton. Henry's fiancée, Victoria Hibbing (Genine Graham), daughter of Lord Hibbing (Tristan Rawson), is now seeing his lookalike brother Terry (Tony Wright), and everyone has been summoned by Henry's ghost to attend the next seance. Fenton is soon discovered murdered, so Colonel March decides to join the audience in order to ferret out the killer, dead or alive. A plot done to death in prior decades, par for the course for this series.


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