A troubled Dr. Geiger seeks a blessing from his institutionalized ex-wife so he can continue his relationship with Dr. Infante. A dying AIDS patient hopes Hancock can arrange a surgical ... See full summary »

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Charles Ellis (as Obba Babatunde)
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Dr. Bob Marinak
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Storyline

A troubled Dr. Geiger seeks a blessing from his institutionalized ex-wife so he can continue his relationship with Dr. Infante. A dying AIDS patient hopes Hancock can arrange a surgical procedure that would allow him to see one more sunrise. Written by Jwelch5742

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15 May 1995 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Soundtracks

Rock-a-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody
(uncredited)
Performed by Mandy Patinkin
Music by Jean Schwartz
Lyrics by Sam Lewis and Joe Young
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User Reviews

 
Best of the First Season
18 May 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

When this show was running concurrently with ER it was the medical drama I preferred because of its more focused story lines (ER was almost always too AADD) and the sublimely talented Mandy Patinkin, later followed by the wonderful Christine Lahti. Patinkin's emotionally dysfunctional and borderline crazy cardiac surgeon, Jeffrey Geiger, was his best TV work, rewarded with an Emmy for his first season. That Emmy had to come in large part from this episode. Geiger, having difficulty starting a new relationship after his divorce from his full blown insane and institutionalized ex-wife, invites all the people in his life to a dinner where he will seek his ex-wife's permission to move on. The dinner turns into a waking nightmare for everyone involved. A tremendous performance by Patinkin and the ensemble make the dinner scene one of the most memorable ever broadcast.


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