Burke's Law: Season 2, Episode 5

Who Killed Everybody? (14 Oct. 1964)

TV Episode  |   |  Action, Adventure, Crime
8.1
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Four poker buddies celebrate the first anniversary of their weekly games with a private party at the Hillsdale Country Club. The festivities end when all four men are killed by a bottle of ... See full summary »

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Title: Who Killed Everybody? (14 Oct 1964)

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Gary Conway ...
...
Leon Lontoc ...
Corinne Calvet ...
Felice De Marco
...
Gloria Cooke
...
Miranda Forsythe
Margaret Leighton ...
Connie Hanson
...
Butterfield
Susan Silo ...
Phoebe McPhee
Joan Huntington ...
Actress
Michael Fox ...
Coroner George McLeod
...
1st Father
Hank Grant ...
2nd Father
Frederick Barry ...
Norman (as Fred Barry)
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Storyline

Four poker buddies celebrate the first anniversary of their weekly games with a private party at the Hillsdale Country Club. The festivities end when all four men are killed by a bottle of poisoned wine. There is no shortage of suspects. Besides having four unhappy wives, the men had incurred the ire of Butterfield, the club's historian, baseball coach, and busybody. Written by Mister-UHF

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Release Date:

14 October 1964 (USA)  »

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(RCA Sound Recording)

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
When one really dislikes the "red herring"
18 May 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I was always an avid BURKE'S LAW fan, particularly as many of the characters in the show were played by well-known character actors. Many of these character actors were not appearing in movies frequently anymore, as age was catching up to them. One of my favorite ones to appear (only once, by the way) on BURKE'S LAW was Alan Mowbray.

The star of BURKE'S LAW (and it's brief spin-off AMOS BURKE: SECRET AGENT) was Gene Barry. A millionaire socialite, he is the chief of police of Los Angeles (and the prototype for Rock Hudson's character on McMILLAN AND WIFE a decade later). He is assisted by Gary Conway and Regis Toomey in each week's episode, in which the victim is a wealthy or prominent person. The episodes were quite satiric, punching holes in stereotypes all over the place (in one, a character with a rough-house reputation played by a young Telly Savalas, turns out to enjoy reading the Greek classics to his servants - he promises to read OEDIPUS REX to them the next weekend!). The worlds of society, Wall Street, politics, advertising, movie making, all got twisted in the series. So did the conventions of detective stories...but naturally that.

The plot of this episode was that every week four members of a posh country club get together for a heavy duty poker game. When the staff comes to rouse them after a night of playing, they find all four are dead - they have been poisoned. Burke comes to the club to investigate. The men were all quite rich, and had the good and bad points associated with murder victims in detective stories (mistresses, bad relations with people in general). So it is one of those crazy cases where you have plenty of potential suspects.

Except there is one good one here: Mowbray.

Mowbray is one of the founding members and the President of this social club. It is so exclusive not even Burke belongs to it. The moment you meet the stuffy, imperturbable Mowbray you can see he's looking through you judging your bloodlines and genes. He's that type.

It seems these four members were not the types Mowbray would encourage to join. They were nouveau rich, but because of various debts and problems running the club Mowbray had to accept their memberships. He didn't like it - ever. Naturally there were frequent conflicts with all these men and Mowbray. Therefore through three quarters of the episode we gradually think it should be Mowbray.

The solution is at the scene of the crime, when Burke sets a trap to catch the real killer. It turns on a simple action that we all use everyday. But it is a neat solution.


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