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"Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Conversations with Dead People (#7.7)"
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"Buffy the Vampire Slayer" Conversations with Dead People (2002)

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Overview

User Rating:
8.9/10   1,182 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Joss Whedon (created by)
Jane Espenson (written by) ...
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Contact:
View company contact information for Conversations with Dead People on IMDbPro.
Original Air Date:
12 November 2002 (Season 7, Episode 7)
Genre:
Plot:
Buffy has a conversation with a vampire who once went to Sunnydale High, and learns something interesting about Spike... See more » | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
Enter the First See more (6 total) »

Cast

 (Episode Cast) (in credits order)

Episode Crew
Directed by
Nick Marck 
 
Writing credits
Joss Whedon (created by)

Jane Espenson (written by) &
Drew Goddard (written by) &
Marti Noxon (written by) uncredited

Produced by
Marc David Alpert .... producer
Gail Berman .... executive producer
Gareth Davies .... producer
Jane Espenson .... co-executive producer
David Fury .... co-executive producer
Sandy Gallin .... executive producer
Fran Rubel Kuzui .... executive producer
Kaz Kuzui .... executive producer
Marti Noxon .... executive producer
John F. Perry .... co-producer
Douglas Petrie .... supervising producer
Denise Pleune .... associate producer
David Solomon .... co-executive producer
Joss Whedon .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Robert Duncan 
 
Cinematography by
Raymond Stella (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Peter Basinski 
 
Casting by
Anya Colloff 
Jennifer Fishman  (as Jennifer Fishman Pate)
Amy McIntyre Britt 
 
Production Design by
Thomas Fichter 
 
Set Decoration by
Susan Mina Eschelbach  (as Susan Eschelbach)
 
Costume Design by
Terry Dresbach 
 
Makeup Department
Belinda Bryant .... makeup artist
Leo Corey Castellano .... prosthetic makeup artist
Sean Flanigan .... key hair stylist
Robert Hall .... special makeup effects creator
Allan B. Holt .... special makeup effects artist
Elvis Jones .... special makeup effects artist: Almost Human, Inc
Peter Montagna .... makeup department head
Brigette A. Myre .... makeup artist (as Brigette Myre-Ellis)
Lisa Marie Rosenberg .... hair stylist
Carol Schwartz .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
John F. Perry .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Sam Hill .... first assistant director
Scott Remick .... second assistant director (as Scott D. Remick)
 
Art Department
Mike Brooks .... construction coordinator
Lisa Gamel .... paint foreman
Andrew T. Grant .... property master (as Andrew Grant)
Kelly Schultz .... set dresser (1998-2002)
Tom Wilson .... lead person
Dennis Winters .... on-set dresser
Sandy Adams .... on-set dresser (uncredited)
Chuck Courrieu .... leadman (uncredited)
David Ronan .... assistant propmaster (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Deb Adair .... sound re-recording mixer
Josh Bower .... sound utility
Bill Jackson .... re-recording mixer
Tom Perry .... re-recording mixer
Cindy Rabideau .... supervising sound editor
Buck Robinson .... production sound mixer
Mike Marchain .... sound editor (uncredited)
Kevin McCullough .... sound editor (uncredited)
Joe Michalski .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Andre G. Ellingson .... special effects coordinator (as Andre Ellingson)
Damian Fisher .... special effects technician (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Rick Baumgartner .... visual effects producer
Loni Peristere .... visual effects supervisor
 
Stunts
John Medlen .... stunt coordinator
Wendi Bromley .... stunt double (uncredited)
Banzai Vitale .... stunt double: Danny Strong (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
John Keefer .... set grip
George Palmer .... key grip
Steven H. Smith .... camera operator (as Steven Smith)
Chris Strong .... chief lighting technician
Patrick Beatty .... grip (uncredited)
Larry Huff .... grip (uncredited)
Tony Olivieri .... Steadicam focus puller (uncredited)
Eric Parker .... assistant chief lighting technician (uncredited)
Bob Snowdon .... grip (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Lonnie Hamerman .... casting associate
Michael V. Nicolo .... casting assistant
Marcia Shulman .... original casting
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Nadine M. Reale .... set costumer
Renee Levy Hazelton .... set costumer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Melissa Black .... post-production coordinator (as Melissa Owen)
Robert Hudson .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
John C. King .... music supervisor
Tommy Morgan .... musician: harmonica (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Bob Ellis .... transportation coordinator (as Robert Ellis)
Richard C. Ryan .... driver
David Travis Grieb .... grip and electric driver/swing (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Tamara Becher .... script coordinator
Natasha Billawala .... assistant: Marti Noxon
Michael Boretz .... assistant: Joss Whedon
Kern J. Eccles .... assistant: Joss Whedon (as Kern Eccles)
Jeffrey Garrett .... location manager
Drew Z. Greenberg .... story editor
Chip Hatton .... assistant: David Solomon
Ken Lee .... production auditor
Laura Lewis .... assistant: Marc Alpert
Suzanne McRobert .... script supervisor
George Montgomery .... title designer
Lisa Ripley-Becker .... production coordinator (as Lisa Ripley Becker)
Rebecca Sinclair .... executive story editor (as Rebecca Rand Kirshner)
Mari Wilson .... script supervisor
Scottee Angel .... production assistant (uncredited)
Jo Brake .... assistant production coordinator (uncredited)
Rob Gibson .... assistant location manager (uncredited)
Jim Hill .... set medic (uncredited)
Stacey Levin .... head publicist (uncredited)
 

Series Crew
These people are regular crew members. Were they in this episode?
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Joss Whedon  created by

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Runtime:
42 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Germany:16 | Israel:PG | Italy:T | New Zealand:M | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:M18 (DVD rating) (season 6) (season 7) | USA:TV-PG

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Amber Benson was supposed to return as The First Evil impersonating Tara, but she didn't want to come back just as a villain, so Cassie Newton (Azura Skye) from a recent episode was put in her place.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: After Dawn pulls the plug on the television set she holds it up in front of her chest, but in the reverse angle she is holding the plug down by her hip.See more »
Quotes:
Buffy:I just - if you knew what I've done, what I've let myself become. My best friends don't even - You'd laugh, if you heard some of the things I've done to them.
Webs:Buffy, I'm here to kill you, not to judge you.
See more »
Movie Connections:
References Star Wars (1977)See more »
Soundtrack:
BlueSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
25 out of 33 people found the following review useful.
Enter the First, 6 September 2006
Author: katierose295 from United States

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

"Conversations with Dead People" is the episode where the First makes itself known to the Scoobies. In one night Cassie brings Willow a message from Tara, Dawn sees her mother, Jonathan and Andrew come back to town and Buffy meets up with a former classmate-turned vampire, who tells her that Spike just sired him. This is a pretty important episode to the story arc this season and you really shouldn't skip it.

"Conversation With Dead People" is hard to explain. Basically, it shows five stories unfolding concurrently. There's Dawn, being attacked in her home by an unseen force. Dawn fights back, thinking that her mother trying to contact her and something evil is blocking the message. "Joyce" finally appears to her and warns Dawn that, when things are at their worst, Buffy will be against her. Meanwhile, Willow sees "Cassie." (The girl who died back in "Help") Cassie claims to have a message from Tara: Willow can never use magic again. If she does, she will wind up destroying the world. Willow buys it at first, but then "Cassie" suggests that Willow kill herself to make sure she can never hurt anyone. Knowing that Tara would never suggest such a thing, Willow demands to know who "Cassie" really is and what she wants. "Cassie" laughs. It seems that "Cassie" isn't Cassie, at all. Instead, Willow realizes its the evil "from beneath you it devours" thing (they don't know to call it the First, yet) And that it's coming after the Scoobies.

Meanwhile Buffy meets up with vampire named Webs, who she actually went to school with. As a human, he was a psychology major and he and Buffy have a long discussion about life and love. When Buffy mentions Spike, Webs claims that Spike is his Sire. That Spike bit and turned him just two nights before. Spike has been sitting at the Bronze talking with a woman all night. After he walks her home, though, he suddenly vamps out and kills her. Then there's the Duo. Jonathan and Andrew are back from Mexico and determined to do good now. At Sunnydale High, "Warren" appears to Andrew. He tells Andrew to kill Jonathan over the Hellmouth seal thing. "Warren" promises that it will allow all of them to become gods. Andrew kills Jonathan, but Jonathan's blood doesn't open the seal.

There are some really good parts to this episode. Buffy's conversation with Web is fun and also very enlightening. It tells you a lot about her character (According to our vampire shrink, she has "inferiority complex about her superiority complex.") Also, Joyce appearing and disappearing on the sofa where she died is really scary. As is "Warren" just standing by the door in the Sunnydale High basement. And I'm really glad to see Jonathan and Andrew back in town. (Even though "33.34%" of them were "flayed alive last time" they were here.) The two of them are so funny together, quoting Star Wars and deciding that they're heroes now. But, Andrew's blind devotion to Warren is so destructive and sad, that he can't break free. Jonathan can fondly reminisce about high school now and say that he still cares about all his fellow students. Andrew can't. He's far more bitter about his high school experiences. Warren was the only "cool" friend that he's ever had. The First, appearing as Warren, can manipulate him so easily. Andrew stabs Jonathan, wanting so badly to believe that Warren is really there and that he's doing the right thing. But, on some level, he already knows that he's made a horrible mistake. His obsession with and revulsion towards stabbing will follow him through out the rest of the series. My heart breaks for Jonathan and Andrew in that scene.

In order to make "Conversations With Dead People" fit into the larger story arc this season, you have to do some creative filling in the blanks. Personally, I explain it as the First targeting Willow, Spike and Buffy because it somehow knows that they will be its strongest adversaries come the season finale, "Chosen." It wants Willow to swear off magic or kill herself, thereby preventing her from joining in the final battle. And it wants Spike and Buffy to fight and kill each other. Either Buffy will kill Spike for feeding again, or Spike will kill her to protect himself. But either way, at least one of the strongest warriors will be gone. As for Dawn, I guess that this episode plays into the later showdown in "Empty Places." When the Scoobies are at their lowest, and turning on Buffy, the First must want Dawn to side against her sister. So, it has her "mother" warn Dawn that Buffy will turn on her. It's the only explanation that I can think of.

On the down side, how did the First move all that stuff around the Summers' living room to scare Dawn? And why did it want Andrew and Jonathan involved? As much as I like them, they are kind of screw ups. If you were an all powerful evil force, wouldn't you get some better henchmen? Maybe it has something to do with that knife. But, then why do the Duo have to have the knife? Couldn't the First just have Spike get it and then dump a dead body on the Hellmouth to open the seal? It seems like it would be a lot simpler. And I'm really sorry to see Jonathan die. He was a basically good person and right up until the end, all he wanted was to belong to the Scoobie gang. He really has one of the most tragic stories in all of the Buffyverse. Also, where was Xander in this episode? How can there be a BTVS without Xander, for crying out loud? It's just wrong.

My favorite part of the episode: Andrew talking to Warren. "One time you died and I became Mexican."

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