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"Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Conversations with Dead People (#7.7)"
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"Buffy the Vampire Slayer" Conversations with Dead People (2002)

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Overview

User Rating:
8.9/10   1,121 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Joss Whedon (created by)
Jane Espenson (written by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Conversations with Dead People on IMDbPro.
Original Air Date:
12 November 2002 (Season 7, Episode 7)
Genre:
Plot:
Buffy has a conversation with a vampire who once went to Sunnydale High, and learns something interesting about Spike... See more » | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
The Last of the Greats See more (6 total) »

Cast

 (Episode Cast) (in credits order)

Episode Crew
Directed by
Nick Marck 
 
Writing credits
Joss Whedon (created by)

Jane Espenson (written by) &
Drew Goddard (written by) &
Marti Noxon (written by) uncredited

Produced by
Marc David Alpert .... producer
Gail Berman .... executive producer
Gareth Davies .... producer
Jane Espenson .... co-executive producer
David Fury .... co-executive producer
Sandy Gallin .... executive producer
Fran Rubel Kuzui .... executive producer
Kaz Kuzui .... executive producer
Marti Noxon .... executive producer
John F. Perry .... co-producer
Douglas Petrie .... supervising producer
Denise Pleune .... associate producer
David Solomon .... co-executive producer
Joss Whedon .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Robert Duncan 
 
Cinematography by
Raymond Stella (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Peter Basinski 
 
Casting by
Anya Colloff 
Jennifer Fishman  (as Jennifer Fishman Pate)
Amy McIntyre Britt 
 
Production Design by
Thomas Fichter 
 
Set Decoration by
Susan Mina Eschelbach  (as Susan Eschelbach)
 
Costume Design by
Terry Dresbach 
 
Makeup Department
Belinda Bryant .... makeup artist
Leo Corey Castellano .... prosthetic makeup artist
Sean Flanigan .... key hair stylist
Robert Hall .... special makeup effects creator
Allan B. Holt .... special makeup effects artist
Elvis Jones .... special makeup effects artist: Almost Human, Inc
Peter Montagna .... makeup department head
Brigette A. Myre .... makeup artist (as Brigette Myre-Ellis)
Lisa Marie Rosenberg .... hair stylist
Carol Schwartz .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
John F. Perry .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Sam Hill .... first assistant director
Scott Remick .... second assistant director (as Scott D. Remick)
 
Art Department
Mike Brooks .... construction coordinator
Lisa Gamel .... paint foreman
Andrew T. Grant .... property master (as Andrew Grant)
Kelly Schultz .... set dresser (1998-2002)
Tom Wilson .... lead person
Dennis Winters .... on-set dresser
Sandy Adams .... on-set dresser (uncredited)
Chuck Courrieu .... leadman (uncredited)
David Ronan .... assistant propmaster (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Deb Adair .... sound re-recording mixer
Josh Bower .... sound utility
Bill Jackson .... re-recording mixer
Tom Perry .... re-recording mixer
Cindy Rabideau .... supervising sound editor
Buck Robinson .... production sound mixer
Mike Marchain .... sound editor (uncredited)
Kevin McCullough .... sound editor (uncredited)
Joe Michalski .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Andre G. Ellingson .... special effects coordinator (as Andre Ellingson)
Damian Fisher .... special effects technician (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Rick Baumgartner .... visual effects producer
Loni Peristere .... visual effects supervisor
 
Stunts
John Medlen .... stunt coordinator
Wendi Bromley .... stunt double (uncredited)
Banzai Vitale .... stunt double: Danny Strong (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
John Keefer .... set grip
George Palmer .... key grip
Steven H. Smith .... camera operator (as Steven Smith)
Chris Strong .... chief lighting technician
Patrick Beatty .... grip (uncredited)
Larry Huff .... grip (uncredited)
Tony Olivieri .... Steadicam focus puller (uncredited)
Eric Parker .... assistant chief lighting technician (uncredited)
Bob Snowdon .... grip (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Lonnie Hamerman .... casting associate
Michael V. Nicolo .... casting assistant
Marcia Shulman .... original casting
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Nadine M. Reale .... set costumer
Renee Levy Hazelton .... set costumer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Melissa Black .... post-production coordinator (as Melissa Owen)
Robert Hudson .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
John C. King .... music supervisor
Tommy Morgan .... musician: harmonica (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Bob Ellis .... transportation coordinator (as Robert Ellis)
Richard C. Ryan .... driver
David Travis Grieb .... grip and electric driver/swing (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Tamara Becher .... script coordinator
Natasha Billawala .... assistant: Marti Noxon
Michael Boretz .... assistant: Joss Whedon
Kern J. Eccles .... assistant: Joss Whedon (as Kern Eccles)
Jeffrey Garrett .... location manager
Drew Z. Greenberg .... story editor
Chip Hatton .... assistant: David Solomon
Ken Lee .... production auditor
Laura Lewis .... assistant: Marc Alpert
Suzanne McRobert .... script supervisor
George Montgomery .... title designer
Lisa Ripley-Becker .... production coordinator (as Lisa Ripley Becker)
Rebecca Sinclair .... executive story editor (as Rebecca Rand Kirshner)
Mari Wilson .... script supervisor
Scottee Angel .... production assistant (uncredited)
Jo Brake .... assistant production coordinator (uncredited)
Rob Gibson .... assistant location manager (uncredited)
Jim Hill .... set medic (uncredited)
Stacey Levin .... head publicist (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Runtime:
42 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Germany:16 | Israel:PG | Italy:T | New Zealand:M | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:M18 (DVD rating) (season 6) (season 7) | USA:TV-PG

Did You Know?

Trivia:
With the exception of the unaired pilot, Sarah Michelle Gellar and Alyson Hannigan were the only two to appear in all 144 episodes.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: After Dawn pulls the plug on the television set she holds it up in front of her chest, but in the reverse angle she is holding the plug down by her hip.See more »
Quotes:
Buffy:You son of a bitch.
Webs:What?
Buffy:I think I'm gonna kill you just a little bit more than usual.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
BlueSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
27 out of 31 people found the following review useful.
The Last of the Greats, 6 July 2008
Author: morphion2 from Australia

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The notion of User Comments for individual episodes of television series' seems at the outset an elaborate and nerdily elitist exercise. Of all the T.V. shows that I love, I'm pretty convinced "Buffy" is the only one this function of IMDb is really useful for. Insofar as you have to already be an avid follower of the show to appreciate them, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" did harbor some of the most amazing and unforgettable singular works of serial narrative ever put on the small screen. It had, in my opinion, more truly great episodes than any other television series of its time (with the possible exception of "The X Files"). "Conversations With Dead People" was the last of them.

The episode is perhaps the most strongly themed of the entire show - while the motifs of loneliness and disconnection had been prominent in the series since the beginning of its sixth season, "Conversations With Dead People" is the only single episode to really commit itself thoroughly to these ideas and their bearings on 'our beloved characters'. From structure and form (five separate stories involving five separate people who never intersect or move from their isolated settings) to the focus of the dialog and nature of the narrative events, the episode concerns itself *only* with the very secret, deep and personal feelings of each of the characters, and the varying degrees of lonely pain that they experience. It's quite a daring and firm shift from action to meditation, and although Dawn's story involving a poltergeist preventing her from communicating with her dead mother has multitudes of violence, loud noises and explosions, the emotional need driving her character through the mess speaks for itself.

These defining, formal peculiarities aside, "Conversations With Dead People" also makes my top ten on account of two quite astounding performances: Alyson Hannigan as series regular Willow turns out one of her most amazing crying sequences, as she mourns openly to a ghost medium about the sudden death of her lover from the previous season. Deemed by fellow Buffy actor Tom Lenk as "one of the best criers in the biz", Hannigan makes good on that quote in this episode, creating some of the most real and heart wrenching emotion seen on commercial T.V.

More surprising though, is the thoroughly compelling performance of one-time guest Johnathon Woodward, as Buffy's undead, Freudian confidante and old, unremembered high school companion. Woodward went on to have cameo spots in each of Joss Whedon's television ventures, but he works enough magic here for all three: his comic balancing act between deep, three-dimensional character and mere physical opponent for Buffy's obligatory fights works splendidly with its own good-humoured ridicule.

Moreover, his remarkable psychoanalytical insights into Buffy, while making no sense by the principles of Vampirism that have been established in the show (Woodward's vampire seems, like James Marsters' Spike, to be some kind of miraculous deviation from the Vampiric model that classically has no human emotion), are dead on and as poignant as any comments made by any character in the history of the series. His compassionate yet matter-of-fact summation of her problem stands as one of my favourite lines of the show: "It all comes down to you feeling alone. But Buffy, everybody feels alone... Everybody *is*. Until they die." His and Buffy's incredibly short-lived relationship establishes such a strong bond so succinctly that for the first time, there actually is pathos in a no-name vampire's death. It's an inarguably bizarre usage of the standard Buffy-kills-a-newborn-demon-in-a-graveyard shtick, but also an incredibly successful one.

Although very clearly *meant* to be a different and radical take on the "Buffy" episode formula, "Conversations With Dead People" benefits beautifully from its very late status in the series by existing against all the expectations built before it. While there had been episodes earlier on in the show that had stood as pretty universally innovative television (that is, unusual for TV) this final-season oddball was able, due to the strength of the series' innovation up until that point, to get by on simply being unusual *for a Buffy episode*. It is perhaps more thematically impenetrable than most, but for the fans in the know, it's a goldmine.

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