The Kingfish swindles Andy out of a rare nickel. Later, he unthinkingly drops it in the slot of a lunchroom's phone booth and places a call. It's now up to Andy and him to figure out how to retrieve the valuable coin without getting caught.

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(script by), (creator) (as Charles Correll) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Alvin Childress ...
Spencer Williams ...
Andy (as Spencer Williams Jr.)
Tim Moore ...
Ernestine Wade ...
Johnny Lee ...
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Storyline

The Kingfish swindles Andy out of a rare nickel. Later, he unthinkingly drops it in the slot of a lunchroom's phone booth and places a call. It's now up to Andy and him to figure out how to retrieve the valuable coin without getting caught.

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Comedy

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Release Date:

19 July 1951 (USA)  »

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(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The $250 offered to Andy for the rare coin in 1951 had the same purchasing power as $2,100 in 2010. See more »

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User Reviews

The Rare Coin is the first of six episodes of "Amos 'n' Andy" I'm reviewing for Black History Month
16 February 2008 | by (Baton Rouge, La.) – See all my reviews

George "Kingfish" Stevens retrieves a letter to Andy Brown concerning a rare nickle from 1877 Andy accidentally found. In trying to get that coin from Andy, Kingfish pretends to be a doctor to get Andy to rest his eyes by blindfolding his face so Andy can sleep in darkness. When the Kingfish tries to call the coin collection company, he accidentally puts the rare coin in the pay phone...While lots more happens here, I'll just say that this was a hilarious episode of what is now considered an offensive program because of the stereotypes concerning blacks of the time. Since most of the programs of the time were white-oriented, they probably had a point but now with many multi-cultural choices on the tube, I think they should bring "Amos 'n' Andy" back on television. TV Land would probably be a good place to start. Anyway, Andy and the Kingfish are a very funny comedy team as perfectly played by Spencer Williams and Tim Moore. Johnny Lee as disbarred lawyer Algonquin J. Calhoun also provides some laughs. Their comic antics are balanced here by many of the African-American cops and judges as well as the good citizen Amos Jones as played by Alvin Childress. So on that note, with this being the first of six episodes I'm reviewing for Black History Month, I'd heartily recommend "Amos 'n' Andy".


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