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Mother, May I Go Out to Swim? 

John Crane is attending a coroner's inquiry and remembers the events that brought him there. John lives with his mother Claire and they are obviously very close. While on holiday, he meets ... See full summary »

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(teleplay), (story)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Himself - Host
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John Crane
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Claire Crane
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Lottie Rank
Robert Carson ...
Inquest Board Chairman
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Clerk of the Court
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Storyline

John Crane is attending a coroner's inquiry and remembers the events that brought him there. John lives with his mother Claire and they are obviously very close. While on holiday, he meets Lottie and falls in love for the first time in his life. When his mother visits, it's obvious she and Lottie do not like one another. Lottie suggest that they take Claire up to the waterfalls to enjoy the view. He knows exactly what Lottie has in mind and resolves the situation. He awaits the decision of the coroner's jury. Written by garykmcd

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10 April 1960 (USA)  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Doesn't fall flat
22 May 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" episode stars a young William Shatner as a character who in some ways is a little reminiscent of a version of Norman Bates from Hitchcock's own "Psycho," except that his mother is still alive and disapproves of his new fiancée.

Shatner gives a very good and somewhat indirectly creepy performance as a naive, rather childish fellow who is fiercely loyal to his mother and distraught over her disapproval of the girlfriend. In fact, a very satisfying sense of intangible unease is achieved in this teleplay; it plays well on the contrast from the facts that we know Shatner's character is a murderer from the start, and that we immediately pick up on his harmless good-boy character.

It's paced very well overall in its half-hour, and though the jump to the consideration of murder towards the end seems to happen too fast to be very believable, the twist at the end was good: I didn't expect it but it made perfect sense once I saw it. Jessie Royce Landis is clear without being broad as Claire, but Gia Scala seems rather stiff to me as the girlfriend, and her Italian accent doesn't really come off as very German. In all, though, a good piece of crime-anthology television.


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