A bored rich girl goes up to her cabin in the mountains. Before the night is over, she'll wish desperately she had just gone home.

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Alfred Hitchcock - Host
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Barbie Hallem
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Benny Mungo
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Diner Customer
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Ed Mungo
John Carlyle ...
Chris Kymer
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Austin
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Partygoer

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Storyline

Barbie Hallem is a bored rich girl, who drinks too much, parties too much and flirts outrageously with any man she meets. And there's no reason to think she stops at flirting, even though she has a boyfriend. But her boyfriend is a drip. He won't punch out a guy when he sees her kissing him. The dullard even tries to take her home when she gets drunk at a party. What she wants to do is go up to the mountains and stay at the cabin her uncle left to her. The boyfriend tries to tag along, but she manages to abandon him at the side of the road. Before the night is over, she'll wish desperately she had just gone home. Written by J. Spurlin

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16 June 1957 (USA)  »

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(RCA Sound Recording)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

[first lines]
Barbie Hallem: Lover, you dance like a gigolo.
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Connections

Featured in The Butler (2013) See more »

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User Reviews

 
This is a standout episode worth watching
27 July 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Although this episode in and of itself, as other reviewers have commented, is not that great, there are several aspects to the story that make this entry quite noteworthy.

Number one is the enticing dance performed by actress Barbara Cook that opens the show. Wow! A slow, steamy grind that has all eyes, including those of the other ladies present, on Barbara. Although she is supposed to be playing a bad girl (in fact, an over-the-top, and therefore not all that believable bad girl), the dance is actually a great example of the timeless expression of femininity. It's not a "dirty dancing" performance at all. Rather it's seductive and at the same time a riveting example of a well shaped woman putting her curves in motion in a manner that both sexes can enjoy.

(btw - another episode that comes to mind in this genre is the very first Hitchcock Presents episode in the series; REVENGE. A young and stunning Vera Miles ('The Man who shot Liberty Valence', The Wrong Man') shows up in a one-piece bathing suit. I always thought this actress was attractive, but she knocks your socks off in this installment. For 1955, the amount of skin she exposes can only be measured in acres. My eyes actually popped out of my head.)

Anyway, also note the people in the dance scene sitting around Barbara watching her dance. Their body positions. The look on their faces. The concentration of beautiful women. You would almost expect to see such a scene in an installment of Playboy After Dark, which of course had not even been invented yet.

A couple of other things to watch for in this episode is the scene when Barbara shows up at her cabin and drinks a beer offered to her by Vic Morrow. It's an over-sized can labeled simply "BEER" in giant lettering. This must be the days before product placement took hold. Also check out the can of whatever Vic Morrow is eating his "dinner" out of. It was opened upside down! Fit the character perfectly. Someone was paying attention to the details here.

And check out that 1st generation T-bird Barbara is driving!! Looks like a '57, but I'm not an expert.

In the end though, as mentioned, this is not a very believable story. You have the selfish, self centered Barbara character abandoning her boyfriend on the side of a road in the middle of NOWHERE at 2AM, with no jacket, simply for being boring. I don't think so. Then you have the demented Vic Morrow character murdering this woman. Far more likely is that he would rape this fox! At least before the murder. Perhaps Hitchcock felt that murder was more palatable to 1950s audiences than sexual assault (it is only referenced indirectly in the aforementioned REVENGE episode). Perhaps that is still true today. Perhaps I even agree. I think I would rather be dead than undergo a rape (being a guy I'm thinking along the lines of prison rape). Yeah. I'd rather be murdered.

Finally, and on an entirely different note, I would have bet money that it was Vic DAMONE who died in that helicopter crash while filming The Twilight Zone, not Vic MORROW. I have always believed it to be Vic Damone, from those Coppertone commercials, who died in that tragic accident ever since the event occurred. Weird. I think I may be in a time warp or something. I mean what, am I going to wake up one morning and find out that Leonard Nimoy played Captain Kirk and Bill Shatner played Spock? And it will all seem normal??


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