77 Sunset Strip (1958–1964)
7.9/10
25
2 user
Stu Bailey finds himself the target of a murder during an investigation.

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Writer:

(as Frederic Brady)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Jeff Spencer
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Kookie (as Edward Byrnes)
Jerome Thor ...
John Cosgrove
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Margo Harris
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Vincent Barrett
Sammy White ...
Phil
Michael Harris ...
Trigger
Jonathan Haze ...
Banjo
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Lt. Roy Gilmore (as Keith Byron)
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Storyline

Stu Bailey finds himself the target of a murder during an investigation.

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Genres:

Action | Crime | Drama

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Release Date:

30 January 1959 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Kookie: Dad if I don't give you the word the balloon goes up in two minutes and I'm in it. It came on big last night but softly.
Stuart Bailey: You sound as if you're in love Kookie.
Kookie: Not just love dad. This time it's the real thing.
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User Reviews

Revenge from a blind man.

One of Stu's friends, a news journalist, loses sight after a murder attempt on his person, only because he wanted to openly denounce drug traffic. But there is a witness, a cab driver who tried to stop the killer in his run. But how blind he is the journalist will stop nothing to get his vengeance, his revenge. And he doesn't hesitate to tell it on the air. The result is that the hired killer, a petty pusher, is shot in a bowling hall. But our private eyes continue their search to find out who monitored the whole thing.

Powerful directing that could perfectly be fine for a large screen release. Richard Bare was in the boss' chair.


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