13 Demon Street

The Vine of Death (1959)

TV Episode  |   |  Horror
5.1
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Ratings: 5.1/10 from 8 users  
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An archaeologist plants calcified bulbs dating back nearly 4000 years, with deadly consequences.

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Title: The Vine of Death (1959)

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
Host (as Lon Chaney)
Pat Clavin ...
Terry Dylan
Lauritz Falk ...
Wallace Forten (as Larry Falk)
Don Molin ...
Detective Johnson
Robert St. Clair ...
Dr. Hystedt
Ingemar Pallin ...
Frank Dylan
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An archaeologist plants calcified bulbs dating back nearly 4000 years, with deadly consequences.

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Horror

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Release Date:

1959 (USA)  »

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Predictable but more enjoyable than others
2 November 2014 | by (Youngstown,Ohio) – See all my reviews

"The Vine of Death" turns out to be one of the more watchable episodes, as archaeologist Frank Dylan (Ingemar Pallin) receives a shipment of 4000 year old calcified bulbs from Malaysia, from a plant known as Mirada, the 'death vine.' Before he has a chance to plant the petrified bulbs in his hothouse, he is accidentally killed by his best friend, Wallace Forten (Larry Falk), during a struggle over Dylan's wife Terry (Pat Clavin, previously seen in "The Black Hand"). She is persuaded not to call the police by Forten, who insists that because she was the one who picked up the knife, she's just as guilty of murder as he is. They decide to bury his corpse in the same place he intended to plant the Mirada, unaware of its attraction to the heat of a human body, winding themselves around humans and strangling them. It ends in predictable fashion yet remains enjoyable (predating a similar story in 1964's "Dr. Terror's House of Horrors"), with host Lon Chaney getting more to do this time around.


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