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1-20 of 83 items from 2009   « Prev | Next »


Best. Lesbian. Decade. Ever. (2000 - 2009)

31 December 2009 3:40 PM, PST | AfterEllen.com | See recent AfterEllen.com news »

As 2009 comes to a close, we take a look back at some of the people and events that made this the Best. Lesbian. Decade. Ever. in pop culture.

Luckily for all of us, there was far more information to have mentioned from the last ten years than we could have included in this brief survey. That's why our lists for each year are not intended to be exhaustive, but are instead snapshots of different memorable moments that included the representation of lesbians and bisexual women in film, television, music, literature, comics, sports and the Internet since the year 2000. 

 

2000

Chavela Vargas[/link] comes out

Mexican ranchera music legend Chavela Vargas publicly came out as a lesbian at the tender age of 81.

Angelina Jolie wins Best Supporting Actress Oscar

Angelina Jolie won an Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Girl, Interrupted and told Talk Magazine, "I only play women I would date. »

- afterellenstaff

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The Best Films of the Decade (aka "The Naughties")

27 December 2009 9:03 PM, PST | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Best Films Of The Decade (aka The Naughties) From Alex & Terry

List # 1

By Alex Simon

When Terry and I initially discussed writing these lists, I had a tough time thinking back on 20 films over the past decade which I was really taken with, thinking that movies have sunk so low over the past ten years, that even choosing a dozen would be a short-order job. Thirty minutes into it, my list had nearly 60 titles! After much cutting, pasting, and re-cutting and pasting, here are my top 20 films (in no particular order) of the first decade of the 21st century, dubbed by many as “the naughties.” --A.S.

1.No Country for Old Men (Coen Brothers, 2007) An elegiac blend of stark beauty and full-throttle despair from two of our finest filmmakers, set in the contemporary American West. Every frame is damn near flawless, and would have been an even more perfect vehicle for the late Sam Peckinpah. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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The people who ruined the decade

11 December 2009 4:58 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Part 2: From Andrew Sachs to Harry Potter

Andrew Sachs Sent the Beeb into cautious compliance meltdown

If Manuel had bothered to pick up his phone, Ross and Brand wouldn't have been tempted to leave their naughty messages, the Daily Mail wouldn't have been able to work itself up into a hypocritical moralistic lather, thousands of people who'd never heard the original show wouldn't have rung in to complain, Russell Brand would still have his Radio 2 show instead of Alan bleedin' Carr, and the BBC wouldn't get all jumpy every time Frankie Boyle made jokes about the Queen's fanny. See Also The Satanic Slut

Steve Jobs Killed the album with his zero-attention-span 'apps'

It was supposed to be so easy. Get your CDs, rip them in to iTunes, put them on your iPod. Then, whenever a latent desire to listen to Reo Speedwagon arose you could sate it right away. »

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The people who ruined the decade

11 December 2009 4:58 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Part 2: From Andrew Sachs to Harry Potter

Andrew Sachs Sent the Beeb into cautious compliance meltdown

If Manuel had bothered to pick up his phone, Ross and Brand wouldn't have been tempted to leave their naughty messages, the Daily Mail wouldn't have been able to work itself up into a hypocritical moralistic lather, thousands of people who'd never heard the original show wouldn't have rung in to complain, Russell Brand would still have his Radio 2 show instead of Alan bleedin' Carr, and the BBC wouldn't get all jumpy every time Frankie Boyle made jokes about the Queen's fanny. See Also The Satanic Slut

Steve Jobs Killed the album with his zero-attention-span 'apps'

It was supposed to be so easy. Get your CDs, rip them in to iTunes, put them on your iPod. Then, whenever a latent desire to listen to Reo Speedwagon arose you could sate it right away. »

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The Naughts: The Documentary of the '00s

7 December 2009 10:17 AM, PST | ifc.com | See recent IFC news »

Sometimes superlatives need to be slung, such as when speaking of the richest, most ambitious and exciting decade yet for nonfiction film -- and, really, what other variety could back up that boast? To nail down a single doc as the preeminent work that typifies these years is no easy task, especially since the best of the bunch attacked specific subjects with laser-like precision and idiosyncratic techniques. (Sit tight, the lede is about to be buried.)

The '00s legitimized the allure of the "pop doc," a trend that shoehorns potentially lackluster material into glossy narratives. Spelling bees were transformed into suspense thrillers ("Spellbound"), quadriplegic rugby players did their own stunts ("Murderball"), tangoing kids got their dance-off ("Mad Hot Ballroom"), a reckless but beautiful feat of derring-do was reenacted like a heist procedural ("Man on Wire"), and a PBS-style nature film became a blockbuster saga of familial survival ("March of the Penguins"). Who'd have thought, »

- Aaron Hillis

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Review of the decade: Peter Bradshaw's noughties round-up

7 December 2009 3:01 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Hollywood struggled to respond to the war on terror, documentaries went through a golden age, and Michael Haneke was the noughties' moral conscience

If it is possible to whimper at the volume of a bang, then that is how this decade is ending on the big screen: with two high-profile, high-budget movies about the end of the world: Roland Emmerich's cheerfully silly 2012, and John Hillcoat's cheerlessly serious The Road, which arrive with a good deal of commentary to the effect that these movies typify the zeitgeist of the decade.

The noughties – that jokey word coined in the carefree 90s – are seen as damaged, injured, traumatised. The decade looks cracked from top to bottom by a sensational act of terrorism; by a reaction that achieved neither political palliative nor military success; by the confrontation between first-world prosperity and developing-world poverty; by the coming environmental catastrophe that threatens to engulf both; and finally, »

- Peter Bradshaw

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2010 Sundance Film Festival Line-Up Announced

3 December 2009 10:01 AM, PST | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

It's almost that time of year again! The Sundance Film Festival unveiled their 2010 line-up yesterday, which includes 112 feature-length films from 39 different countries. As always, the vast majority of filmmakers are unknowns, and many are first-time directors, so it's kind of hard to tell which ones hold the most promise. However, you can bet that a number of these will be movies that people are raving about by the end of 2010. A few of the highlights include: Sympathy for Delicious: Directed by Mark Ruffalo and starring Orlando Bloom as a paralyzed DJ who seeks out the world of faith healing. Howl: Starring James Franco as the beat poet Allen Ginsberg. Casino Jack & The United States of Money:Alex Gibney-directed doc about D.C. super-lobbyist Jack Abramoff. Lucky: Documentary about lottery winners by Jeffrey Blitz (Spellbound). Welcome to the Rileys: Kristen Stewart plays a young stripper who forms a »

- Sean

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Sundance Lineup: Sebastian Junger War Doc, Pat Tillman Story

2 December 2009 1:04 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

By Lisa Horowitz

The latest film from "An Inconvenient Truth" director Davis Guggenheim and Amir Bar-Lev's documentary about football player-turned-soldier Pat Tillman are among the documentaries set for the competition at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.

The Sundance Institute on Wednesday announced the lineup of films selected to screen in the U.S. and World Cinema Dramatic and Documentary competitions for the 2010 festival.

On Thursday, the festival will reveal the lineup of films in five out-of-competition sections.

Well-known names on the list of documentary directors inc »

- Sharon Waxman

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Gold Derby nuggets: Hit docs left off Oscars long list | Crazy journey for 'Crazy Heart' | 'Lost' returns Feb. 2

19 November 2009 6:55 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

• Only 15 of the 89 feature-length documentaries eligible made it onto the academy's long list that will now be winnowed down to a final five by members of the documentary branch. Among those widely distributed docs that failed to make the cut were Oscar champ Michael Moore's ("Bowling for Columbine") latest effort "Capitalism: A Love Story" -- which merited just 61 at Metacritic -- as well as "The September Issue" (Mc score of 69), Oscar winner Davis Guggenheim's ("An Inconvenient Truth") rock doc "It Might Get Loud" (Mc score of 70), "Anvil! The Story of Anvil" (Mc score of 82) and "Tyson" (Mc score of 83). Each of the sub-themes of those snubbed docs »

- tomoneil

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Michael Moore won’t be causing a ruckus at the Oscars this year

19 November 2009 8:34 AM, PST | ReelLoop.com | See recent Reel Loop news »

In a surprising snub, Michael Moore’s Capitalism: A Love Story heads a list of high profile non-fiction features ignored in the long-list vying for a Best Documentary Academy Award Nomination.

The rotund polemicist had previously won the award for Bowling Columbine and pushed for his Palme D’Or winning follow-up Fahrenheit 9/11 to contend in the Best Picture category. The snub is quite astonishing although it may well relate to his controversial acceptance speech in 2002 where he used the Academy stage to badmouth then incumbent president George W. Bush.

Capitalism: A Love Story is joined, rather incredibly, by James Toback’s insightful Tyson biopic and one of the years best films Anvil! The Story of Anvil. Moore was also not the only former winner to fail to gain a nomination either. David Guggenheim, director of An Inconvenient Truth, and his film It Might Get Loud also constitute a notable omission. »

- Kieron

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Oscar Watch: Documentary Branch Snubs Capitalism: A Love Story

18 November 2009 4:14 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Academy documentary branch has named their short list of fifteen films (full list on jump), which will be narrowed down to five on Oscar nominations morning February 2. Winning the Oscar would seem to have been a disqualifier this year, as the doc committee snubbed this year’s highest-profile documentary, Michael Moore’s Capitalism: A Love Story as well as It Might Get Loud, whose director David Guggenheim won the Oscar for An Inconvenient Truth. This group tends to lean toward social activism like The Cove or Food Inc. (the only film to score top noms at the Gotham, Cinema Eye, and Ida Documentary Awards) more than … »

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PGA Honors Precious.

18 November 2009 3:18 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Jose here with some award news.

Continuing to establish itself as a front runner in the awards race, Precious: Based on the novel 'Push' by Sapphire, has been chosen by the Producers Guild of America to receive its prestigious Stanley Kramer Award for illuminating provocative social issues in an accessible and elevating fashion.

This award not only confirms the movie will be one of the ten chosen by the PGA for its Producer of the Year award, but bodes well for its chances of getting even more Oscar attention.

The Academy simply loves social issues (remember 2005?) and Kramer (who directed and produced Inherit the Wind and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner among others) was an icon in this aspect, even if the quality of the films he made didn't amount to much artistically. Stanley's films always talked about things we wanted to ignore. He taught us so much about ourselves »

- Jose

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Gore Urged To Go Veggie For 30 Days

11 November 2009 5:41 PM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Celebrated environmental activist Al Gore has a new challenge on his hands - to go veggie for 30 days.

The politician, author and star of documentary An Inconvenient Truth will face PETA protesters when he arrives at a book signing event in Los Angeles on Thursday; they'll be urging Gore to give up meat.

Led by a near-naked activist dressed as Mother Earth, the PETA supporters will attempt to convince Gore that vegetarianism is a key to securing the future of the planet.

PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman says, "More and more, we are hearing about the damage that meat production does to our water supply, the forests, and the global climate.

"In light of these reports, we are asking Mr. Gore simply to try going vegetarian for 30 days. During that time, he could save eight animals' lives and maybe even his own!" »

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Film: Review:Collapse

5 November 2009 12:01 PM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

The current documentary landscape is chockfull of doom-laden scenarios of every stripe: If global warming (An Inconvenient Truth) doesn’t get you, then maybe genetically engineered Frankenfoods (Food, Inc.), will. Or contaminated water (Flow). Or crushing personal (Maxed Out) and national (I.O.U.S.A.) debt. But few apocalyptic visions are as comprehensive and frighteningly assured as the one offered by Michael Ruppert, the subject of Chris Smith’s mesmerizing new documentary Collapse. A former Los Angeles police officer turned independent reporter, Ruppert has chased big stories for his self-published newsletter, From The Wilderness, on everything from CIA involvement »

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This Is It Madness

3 November 2009 2:03 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

two brief but belated Oscar notes

For months now, people have been reciting various reasons why the 10-Wide Best Picture field is a bad idea. For all the chatter no one has yet talked about the most harmful effect of this decision: armchair and professional punditry has slipped, perhaps irrevocably, into insanity. The world has entirely forgotten what the Oscars are like or, rather, what they like. In the summer everyone seemed convinced that totally atypical films like Star Trek (X), The Hangover and District 9 were Best Picture likely. The new 'Best Pic Nominee To Be' is This Is It, the Michael Jackson documentary. [I've tried not to mention this article for well over 48ish hours but I've finally caved because it's been haunting my thoughts ever since. Share in the daymares with me!] That prediction comes despite the fact that Michael Jackson has never even been so much as a songwriting Oscar nominee and no documentary has ever performed that trick. In fact, I'm not sure you'd even be able to find a documentary that has managed more »

- NATHANIEL R

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Review: Earth Days

1 November 2009 12:36 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Here we are, the day after Halloween. The day of the dead, All Hallow’s Eve, has come and past for another year and we now fully embrace the autumn season, the season of temporary death. This is the season of life going dormant, but it does so with the intent of reviving itself even stronger and more fertile in the months of spring. So, for me it seems a fitting time for a new documentary about the state of our environment.

So, I can almost hear the many voices asking why we need another documentary on this subject, one that has been nearly beaten into the ground as of late. But, has it really run it’s course? Have we really seen any impact in practice from the previous slew of documentaries on the topic? Personally, I believe we’ve only begun to even consider the truth of the relationship between us, »

- Travis

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Good Halloween Movie Double Features

24 October 2009 8:00 PM, PDT | MoviesOnline.ca | See recent MoviesOnline news »

With Halloween on the horizon, a lot of people might be planning a shindig of some sort to celebrate. Most will have costume parties, which is terrific, as they usually involve scantily clad females pretending to be something ordinary like a prison guard or dental hygienist, but really sexy. These parties will also most likely contain disturbing, horror-themed food-stuffs, and an increasingly gory display of body parts strewn across the premises like something out of a bad crime scene.

(I tell you, if I had money, I would invest in a Halloween store, as they seem to make mint and only have to work 3 months of the year).

There are also large groups of nerds out there (myself included) who enjoy subjecting their friends to horror movies they may have not yet seen, or seen with a group of people, which is the best way to experience most horror flicks. »

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‘Home’ - Rob Reports from Viff

20 October 2009 4:22 PM, PDT | MovieSet.com | See recent MovieSet.com news »

Home‘ screened at Granville 7, Vancouver International Film Festival on October 16, 2009

By Robert Shaer

Movie: Home

Director: Yann-Arthus Bertrand

The first stunning images of Yann-Arthus Bertrand’s newest film, Home, are of a landscape continuously shaped by the volcanoes that dominate it. This is a world appearing free from human influence remaining a ‘living record that offers us a glimpse of what Earth was like at its birth’ suggests the narrator. Better known for his aerial still photography, notably the book and traveling exhibit Earth From Above, Yann-Arthus Bertrand offers Home as spectacular view of the world consistent with a body of work that spans every continent and too many countries to count. It is also an unapologetic and somewhat dour look at the precarious imbalance between human industry and the natural world.

I first encountered Bretrand’s work late in 2003, at an outdoor exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, »

- Kyle Zahar

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It Might Get Loud Cranks It Up on DVD and Blu-ray on December 22nd

13 October 2009 9:42 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

You can bring home a documentary featuring three amazing guitarists on DVD and Blu-ray this December. It Might Get Loud will be released on DVD and Blu-ray on December 22. The standard DVD will be priced at $27.96 Srp while the Bd will go for $37.95 Srp. We don't have cover art images yet, but we'll update this story as soon as we have the artwork. The film stars Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, U2's The Edge and The White Stripes' Jack White.

The electric guitar has dominated popular music for the last half century. Anyone who has ever plugged into an amp understands its power. So does the average stadium crowd. But if you have too much exposure to amateurs, you might forget the incredible range of expression that the creation pioneered by Les Paul can achieve in the hands of masters.

Director Davis Guggenheim, well-known for his Academy Award-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth, »

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Blu-Ray Review: ‘Ghost House Underground Four Film Collection’ Offers Few Chills

12 October 2009 8:07 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – It’s always nice to see world-famous filmmakers raising awareness about work from their lesser known peers. Where would Eli Roth be without Quentin Tarantino, or Neill Blomkamp be without Peter Jackson, or Danny McBride and Jody Hill be without the better half of Hollywood’s comedy titans? That’s why it’s nice to see “Evil Dead” creators Sam Raimi and Rob Tapert “hand pick” the indie horror films they admire, and then assist in their distribution.

Overall Blu-Ray Rating: 2.5/5.0

Raimi and Tapert’s “Ghost House Underground” series began last year with a collection of eight features that included the exuberant zombie satire “Dance of the Dead.” This year’s collection has shrunk to four features, none of which are as fun or memorable as last year’s “Dance.” Only one film manages to satisfy, while the other three vary in their degrees of mediocrity and failure. Let »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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