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Forgive Us Our Trespasses (1913)

The young telegraph operator had for many years been a faithful employee of the railroad, but one day when word was brought to him that his little daughter was dying, he left his post and ... See full summary »
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The Wife (as Peggy Reid)
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The young telegraph operator had for many years been a faithful employee of the railroad, but one day when word was brought to him that his little daughter was dying, he left his post and hastened to her bedside in time to kiss his child before she died. When the grief-stricken father returned to the station, a stern-faced man sat at the telegraph desk. It was the superintendent of the road. He listened contemptuously to the telegrapher's explanation, then told him curtly that he was discharged, saying that "family troubles" did not concern him. The other railroads did not care to employ the disgraced telegrapher and the positions he was able to secure did not pay sufficient money to enable him to properly care for his wife. Grief for her child and privation did their work, and the man found himself alone in the world, with a bitter and implacable hatred towards the man who had caused him so much suffering. Several years after the operator was discharged, a train dispatcher made a ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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Release Date:

24 June 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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This is not a well rounded story
20 September 2017 | by See all my reviews

There is one very good situation in this, where the tramp telegrapher tells the dispatcher he will not sidetrack the train on which the latter's wife and child are riding. Later, his better nature asserts itself, but not before the dispatcher had learned what it means to suffer. This is not a well rounded story and is poorly developed in places, but it has several points of interest. - The Moving Picture World, July 5, 1913


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