A married man is having an affair during which his clothes and money are stolen by a house burglar. How is he to going get home when all he has left is his underwear?

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Episode complete credited cast:
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Howard
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Penny
Frank Jarvis ...
Burglar
Bill Oddie ...
Jimmy
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Wife
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A married man is having an affair during which his clothes and money are stolen by a house burglar. How is he to going get home when all he has left is his underwear?

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Comedy

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19 April 1969 (UK)  »

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Casanova 69?
6 February 2017 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

After what seems like an eternity, 'The Galton & Simpson Comedy' has finally arrived on D.V.D. It dates back to 1969 and was commissioned by Frank Muir, then head of comedy at London Weekend Television ( a fact he reminded us of when the episode 'An Extra Bunch Of Daffodils' was shown as part of Channel 4's 'T.V. Heaven' back in the early 90's ).

The first episode of the six-part series is 'The Suit'. Businessman 'Howard Butler' ( Leslie Phillips ) and the lovely 'Penny' ( Jennie Linden ) have just spent the night together. While they slept, a burglar ( Frank Jarvis ) broke in and stole not only her watch, but also his suit. How is Howard going to go home to his wife ( Jan Holden ) in the middle of the night dressed only in his underwear?

This can now be regarded as a dry run for Ray and Alan's B.B.C. sitcom 'Casanova 73'. Phillips is essentially the same character, barring the fact that he has a different name ( he was 'Henry Newhouse' in that, while Holden was his wife 'Carol'. Here she goes unnamed ). A pre-'Goodies' Bill Oddie pops up briefly as Penny's hippy brother. There's not much one can say about this; it is farcical but is intended to be. When Paul Merton remade it in 1997 ( as part of 'Paul Merton In Galton & Simpson's' ), it did not work because Merton is not a very good actor and was not remotely believable as a twentieth-century libertine.

Funniest moment - Howard kitted out in Oddie's flamboyant clothes, looking like John Lennon circa 1968. "I can't go home like this!", he exclaims, despairingly.


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