Fourteen year-old, Hannah, awakes to a momentous day of gifts and attention. She soon realizes that this day of great celebration will turn out to have significant consequences on her future.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Laken Romine ...
Hannah
Diana Gayl ...
Connie
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Clergyman
Kit Dennis ...
Ezra
Larry Hanes ...
Owen
...
Sister #1
Halle Pickering ...
Emma
Brooke Pickett ...
Extra
Dana Pickett ...
Extra
...
Mormon Wife
Sierra Schiano ...
Sister #2
Anastasia Katherine Smith ...
Extra
Edit

Storyline

Hannah isn't yet awake and the household is busy. Her mother is baking a cake; her younger sisters wrap a present that they take into her bedroom and put noisily on the nightstand before running out. She awakes, goes into the bathroom, opens the gift, and puts it on - it's a heart pendant, probably a locket. She changes from her nightgown into a blouse; she's probably 14, at the beginning of puberty. A young woman helps her dress in white. People are assembled outside. For a birthday? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

January 2006 (USA)  »

Box Office

Budget:

$5,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Film of Small and Big Moments
16 October 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

A young girl somewhere in middle America turns 14 and her life is poised for a momentous change. The camera follows her on that fateful morning as she and her family prepare themselves for the new beginning ahead. That description may seem somewhat lacking, but it can be hard to write a blurb for something like Fourteen a film with no dialogue and a twist ending. What is there to say that doesn't give too much away?

Let me instead attest to its quality rather than its plot. Showcased at numerous film festivals in 2006, (I caught it at Seattle International, but it played SXSW, AFI, Sundance and others) Fourteen is a film of small moments; care is given to each shot, depicting with tenderness seemingly unimportant activities such as an apron being tied, or the young girl's hair being done up, but the shots are linked with such pacing and lyricism that they never fail to keep one's attention transfixed through to the unsettling end. A beautiful score and excellent cinematography further highlight a truly accomplished effort both technically and artistically from director Nicole Barnette.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?