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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

15 items from 2016


TV News Roundup: ’12 Monkeys’ Renewed for Season 3 at Syfy & More

29 June 2016 2:31 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

“12 Monkeys” has been renewed for Season 3 on Syfy; Kris Jenner and more celebrities will appear on E! second season of “Hollywood Medium with Tyler Henry;” VH1 has announced Marc Lamont Hill as the host of its new late night talk show; and Netflix has debuted the first trailer for Season 3 of “BoJack Horseman,” in today’s TV news roundup.

Greenlights

Syfy has renewed “12 Monkeys” for Season 3, Variety has confirmed. The time-travel drama will return with a 10-episode third season in 2017. The show, based on the 1995 film of the same name, is currently in the midst of its second season, airing Mondays at 9 p.m. on Syfy. “12 Monkeys” stars Aaron Stanford and Amanda Schull and is executive produced by Terry Matalas and Travis Fickett. The show hails from Universal Cable Productions in association with Atlas Entertainment. EW first reported the show’s renewal.

VH1 has announced a new late night talk show titled “VH1 Live!” debuting »

- Lamarco McClendon

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Netflix Planning "Alias Grace" Series

22 June 2016 6:02 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Streaming giant Netflix has announced plans to team with Halfire Entertainment and Canadian broadcaster CBC for the six-hour scripted true-crime miniseries "Alias Grace" based on the 1996 non-fiction book by Margaret Atwood.

The story follows Grace Marks, a poor and young Irish immigrant and domestic servant in upper Canada who, along with stable hand James McDermott, was convicted of the brutal murders of their employer and housekeeper in 1843.

McDermott was hanged, while Marks was sentenced to life imprisonment. She became one of the most enigmatic and notorious women of 1840s Canada and was eventually exonerated after thirty years in jail.

The series will introduce a fictional young doctor who researches the case and falls in love with Marks. He soon becomes obsessed with her as he seeks to reconcile his perception of the mild-mannered woman he sees with the savage murder of which she has been convicted.

Sarah Polley ("Away From Her »

- Garth Franklin

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Sarah Polley adapting Margaret Atwood crime novel for Netflix series

21 June 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The Canadian actor turned writer and director will adapt Atwood’s 1996 book, Alias Grace, into a miniseries, with American Psycho’s Mary Harron directing

Netflix has teamed with Sarah Polley (director of Away From Her) and Mary Harron (American Psycho) for a new true-crime series, based on a novel by Canadian author Margaret Atwood, about convicted murderer Grace Marks. Polley, who last directed the acclaimed documentary Stories We Tell, will write and produce the six-hour miniseries, with Harron on board as director.

Alias Grace, bearing the same title as Atwood’s 1996 book, will tell the story of Grace Marks, a young Irish immigrant and domestic servant in upper Canada, who along with stable hand James McDermott, was convicted of the brutal murders of their employer and his housekeeper. Marks was eventually exonerated after 30 years, while McDermott was hanged for the crimes.

Related: Don't ask for the truth

Continue reading »

- Nigel M Smith

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Sarah Polley adapting Margaret Atwood crime novel for Netflix series

21 June 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Canadian actor turned writer and director will adapt Atwood’s 1996 book, Alias Grace, into a miniseries, with American Psycho’s Mary Harron directing

Netflix has teamed with Sarah Polley (director of Away From Her) and Mary Harron (American Psycho) for a new true-crime series, based on a novel by Canadian author Margaret Atwood, about convicted murderer Grace Marks. Polley, who last directed the acclaimed documentary Stories We Tell, will write and produce the six-hour miniseries, with Harron on board as director.

Alias Grace, bearing the same title as Atwood’s 1996 book, will tell the story of Grace Marks, a young Irish immigrant and domestic servant in upper Canada, who along with stable hand James McDermott, was convicted of the brutal murders of their employer and his housekeeper. Marks was eventually exonerated after 30 years, while McDermott was hanged for the crimes.

Continue reading »

- Nigel M Smith

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Alias Grace Picked Up by Netflix with Sarah Polley and Mary Harron on Board

21 June 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Fans of crime drama, prepare to get excited. Netflix continues on its streak of original productions with a mini-series adaptation of Alias Grace, the best-selling novel by world-renowned author Margaret Atwood. Sarah Polley (Away From Her, Stories We Tell) will write and produce, and Mary Harron (American Psycho, I Shot Andy Warhol) is set to direct. The novel is based on the 19th century true story of Grace Marks, a poor Irish immigrant who worked in Upper Canada (now Ontario) as a domestic servant. She and another servant, James McDermott, were convicted of the murders of of their employer, Thomas Kinnear, and his housekeeper, Nancy Montgomery. McDermott was hanged for the crime, while Marks spent 30 years in prison. It was one of the most...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

»

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5 Must-See Films At The 2016 New York Asian Film Festival

21 June 2016 10:47 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If it’s late June in Manhattan, it must be time for the city’s annual dose of martial-arts madness, indescribably twisted revenge stories, and go-for-broke dramas about sexually liberated high school girls. A collaboration between Subway Cinema and The Film Society of Lincoln Center, the New York Asian Film Festival has established itself as one of the summer’s most vital (and occasionally traumatizing) annual events, a celebration of the best and most bonkers in classic and contemporary Asian cinema. Even in an age of VOD and streaming, many — or most — of these gems never receive American distribution, making the fest that much more valuable to local cinephiles.

Running from June 22 thru July 9, the 2016 edition promises to live up to the Nyaff legend, as iconic films like “All About Lily Chou-Chou” and “Tetsuo: The Iron Man” will be screened alongside a smorgasbord of new stuff that’s just waiting to be discovered. »

- David Ehrlich

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Sarah Polley, Mary Harron’s ‘Alias Grace’ Miniseries to Enter Production for Netflix, CBC

21 June 2016 10:13 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Halfire Entertainment, CBC and Netflix will begin production on the adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s “Alias Grace,” which will be a six-hour miniseries inspired by the true story of convicted murderer Grace Marks. The miniseries is being written and produced by Sarah Polley (“Away From Her”) and will be directed by Mary Harron (“American Psycho”). Production is set to begin in Ontario in August. “Alias Grace” will be broadcast in Canada on CBC and available for streaming on Netflix globally. It follows Grace Marks, a young Irish immigrant in Upper Canada who was convicted, along with her brother, of the brutal murders of. »

- Beatrice Verhoeven

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Netflix Nabs Sarah Polley Miniseries Based on Margaret Atwood True-Crime Novel

21 June 2016 7:23 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Netflix will soon be adding a historical true-crime drama to its queue.

The streaming service is teaming up with Halfire Entertainment and Canadian broadcaster CBC on the six-hour miniseries “Alias Grace,” based on Margaret Atwood’s novel of the same name about convicted murderer Grace Marks.

The series is being written and produced by Sarah Polley (“Away From Her”), and directed by Mary Harron (“American Psycho”). “Alias Grace” will be broadcast in Canada on CBC and will stream globally on Netflix.

Alias Grace” follows Grace Marks, a poor Irish immigrant and domestic servant living in Canada who, along with stable hand James McDermott, was convicted in 1843 of the murders of their employer, Thomas Kinnear, and his housekeeper, Nancy Montgomery. James was hanged while Grace was sentenced to life in prison. Marks became one of the most notorious women of 1840s Canada for her alleged role in the double murder, and was eventually exonerated after 30 years in jail »

- Maane Khatchatourian

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‘Alias Grace’: Netflix & CBC Pick Up Sarah Polley Miniseries Based On Margaret Atwood Novel

21 June 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Netflix and Canadian broadcaster CBC have teamed up to greenlight Alias Grace, a six-hour miniseries from Sarah Polley (Away from Her) and Noreen Halpern’s Halfire Entertainment. The mini is inspired by the historical true story of convicted murderer Grace Marks and based on Margaret Atwood’s novel. Polley, who originally adapted the book as a feature four years ago, is writing and producing, and Mary Harron (American Psycho) directs. Production is scheduled to begin in… »

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Sarah Polley Begins Shooting 6-Hour Miniseries ‘Alias Grace’ This Summer

16 May 2016 1:13 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It’s been far too long since we’ve had a movie from Sarah Polley. The actress turned filmmaker made her mark with 2006’s “Away From Her,” followed it up with the underrated relationship/break up movie “Take This Waltz,” and the delivered the personal and deeply moving documentary “Stories We Tell.” That was four years ago. But […]

The post Sarah Polley Begins Shooting 6-Hour Miniseries ‘Alias Grace’ This Summer appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Brian D. Johnson’s Documentary ‘Al Purdy Was Here’ Finds Poetry in Cinema

26 April 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

Was it Godard or was it Truffaut who said “critics make the best directors”?

A film critic by trade and a poet in his heart, Brian D. Johnson began his film “Al Purdy Was Here” as a fundraising tool to save the A-frame cabin in the woods built by Canadian poet Al Purdy and his wife Eurithe.  As making the film progressed, Johnson began to see much more in the film than merely a vehicle [piece] to raise money.  “Al Purdy Was Here” soon evolved into something much greater, something deeply poetic by a writer who himself treasures poetry even as he critiques films….

Brian says, “It is about art and life and the fact that they are often in conflict as we try to make our lives.  Poetry is my aim…finding poetry in cinema.  But music was the reason I made the film.”

 Canada's leading musicians and artists come together to tell the tale of Al Purdy. 

The documentary features archival materials and first-hand accounts, including interviews with his publisher Howard White, editor Sam Solecki, widow Eurithe Purdy, poets Dennis Lee, Steven Heighton and George Bowering—and Bowering's wife Jean Baird, the powerhouse behind the campaign to save and restore Purdy's A-Frame cabin.

Read Indiewire for more about the movie here.

Gordon Pinsent (“Away from Her”), Michael Ondaatje (“The English Patient”), Leonard Cohen (“Natural Born Killers”), Margaret Atwood (“The Handmaid’s Tale”) all pay tribute to him along with other well known writers, actors, directors and singers who adapt his poetry.

This film premiered, naturally enough, at Tiff 2015 but I only caught up with it at Iff Panama this year because Brian – whom I met one year in Havana and loaned him $100 to pay his hotel bill --  was at Iff Panama where his film was screening.  With him was our friend-in-common, Latinaphile, Helga Stephenson, so I tagged along as a friend to see a film about a person I had never heard of before.  And I was entranced by what I saw. 

Al Purdy was known to be a raucous, barroom brawling Canadian poet, something on a par with Charles Bukowski.  In fact they were friends and corresponded extensively, but there is some question as to whether Purdy’s character as a barroom brawler was put on as his persona to help popularize his poetry.  Was he actually such a rough person? His wife, Eurithe Purdy, who survived him and is featured in the movie said that at home he was quite a peaceable man (when he was not boozing it up with his pals). He was also a philosophical soul, enraptured by nature—Canada's Walt Whitman as well as its Bukowski.

Sl: How did you get these musicians?

I went to the pantheon of famous Canadian singer-songwriters and asked them to compose and record music inspired by Purdy's work. We paid engineers and musicians. But the artists licensed their songs to us for free, and in return they got to own the rights to the songs.

I got in touch with Neil Young through his brother. I loved Neil's music, and interviewed him for one of his films.  Remember Neil Young: Heart of Gold directed by Jonathan Demme?

I sent Neil a Purdy poem called "My 48 Pontiac", written from the Pov of a car in a junk yard—knowing Neil loves old cars. He never did get around to recording an original number for us, but he loved the poem, and the project. So when we wanted to use "Journey Through the Past" (from Neil's 1971 Massey Hall concert album) on the soundtrack, he gave us the rights at no cost.

We selected half a dozen songs for the movie but commissioned and recorded six more, and we're assembling all of them on an album called "The Al Purdy Songbook".

Meanwhile, the film's score was composed by my son, Casey Johnson, who recorded it all with purely analog technology—in the spirit of Purdy's rough and raw esthetic.

The music played at a 2013 benefit concert to save Purdy's cabin in the woods become the impetus for me to make the movie. I remember leaving the show and telling the organizers, "The next thing you should do is an Al Purdy Songbook.") I didn't know I'd end up doing it myself. And as it turned out, it was the music that made the film possible. Musicians are more famous than poets. They have an audience.  And this is a movie about a dead poet.  How do you make a movie about a dead poet?

The music brings it to life . . .  I suppose I could have made a zombie movie instead.

Sl: How did you cast the movie?

You get the most famous people lined up and then the rest follow.  I’m friends with Michael Ondaatje. I know Margaret Atwood. I know Leonard Cohen. So I started there.

Sl: How did you finance the film?

The CBC Documentary Channel gave us 25% of the budget and that triggered the rest of the financing. The  Rogers Documentary Fund and the Rogers Cable Fund became the other principal contributors.

But Ron Mann, who exec produced, got the ball rolling, and his company, Films We Like, came onboard as the Canadian distributor. We're still looking for international distribution.

The movie felt like a barn-raising, with everyone pitching in to help make it work.

Brian D. Johnson is former film critic for Maclean's, Canada's weekly newsmagazine, is the current president of the Toronto Film Critics Association. Over the years, he also worked as a musician and published poetry, a novel, and several works of non-fiction, including a 25th-anniversary history of Tiff, "Brave Films, Wild Nights, 25 Years of Festival Fever. "Al Purdy was Here” (2015) is his first feature documentary. Once again he'll be writing about film for Maclean's in May at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival.

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- Sydney Levine

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All the TV Shows and Movies Hitting Hulu in April

22 March 2016 11:25 AM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Netflix and HBO Now aren't the only places to see great shows and movies in April! Hulu has so many titles coming, including the season finales for a bunch of your favorite shows. Ferris Bueller's Day Off and My Best Friend's Wedding will also be available, among several other vintage films. Check out the full list below, and get a load of Netflix and HBO Go's new picks, too! Available April 1 Shades of Blue, season one finale You, Me & the Apocalypse, season one finale Barbershop, complete season one Alfie American Loser Amistad And You Thought Your Parents Were Weird! Arctic Tale The Arrival Away From Her Bad Boys II Bananas Basic Instinct 2 The Bear Bloodsucking Bastards Brighton Rock Carlos Chelsea Walls Cinema Paradiso Count Yorga, Vampire Cube Cube 2: Hypercube Cube Zero Dead Heat Dead Man The Dead Zone Death Wish Deuces Wild Donnie Brasco Dr. T. and the »

- Maggie Pehanick

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New to Streaming: ‘River of Grass,’ ‘Arabian Nights,’ ‘Paris Belongs to Us,’ ‘The Forbidden Room,’ and More

11 March 2016 9:52 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Arabian Nights (Miguel Gomes)

In lauding Miguel Gomes‘ three-part, six-and-a-half hour behemoth, it’s perhaps important to consider his background as a critic. Not just in terms of the trilogy’s cinephilic engagement with Rossellini, Alonso, Oliveira, etc.; also in its defiant nature. While it’s easy to assign the trilogy certain humanist and satirical labels from the get-go and just praise these films for following through on them, »

- TFS Staff

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Review: 'Girls' Season 5 Episode 2, 'Good Man': A Bit of a Gay-mergency

28 February 2016 7:30 PM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Last Week's Review: Review: 'Girls' Season 5 Episode 1, 'Wedding Day': Marnie Walks Down the Aisle Love Her or Hate HerCurrent teaching choices aside, Hannah's overall behavior this week was somewhat more mature than it's been in the past. Between having a full-time job and, for a change, an actual good guy in Fran, she's the healthiest she's been to date and comes across as having grown up spades since last week's premiere. Away from her friends and Adam, she's been allowed to grow, but her parents' ongoing problems also force her to become the adult in that relationship, as she re-teaches her father about the dating world and serves as a sounding board for her chain-smoking mother. Something to Cringe AboutThis week's cold open, in which we meet Fran's disturbed neighbor Jacob, was hard enough to swallow, as realistic scenes of mental disabilities often are. But it was also scary, »

- Amber Dowling

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Blacula

16 January 2016 11:13 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Blaxploitation films burst onto the scene in 1971 with the huge success of Gordon Park’s Shaft. By 1972, audiences were clamoring for more, and filmmakers and studios were keen to jump on the bandwagon. While most of the majors were focusing on the Shaft formula of hot chicks and cool Dicks, American International Pictures saw a void that no one had filled yet: the black horror film. And so, with as little money as they usually invested, they sent forth into the world Blacula (1972), and wouldn’t you know it? Audiences loved it.

Just don’t call it Blaxploitation—because it isn’t. Blacula, surprisingly, showcases little of the developing tropes already established by Shaft. There is no "jive" talk, no gratuitous nudity or overwhelming violence. And I say "surprisingly", because it would have been so easy (not to mention profitable) to follow the formula set in motion by Shaft, Superfly, »

- Scott Drebit

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

15 items from 2016


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