7.7/10
11,562
155 user 87 critic

Who Killed the Electric Car? (2006)

A documentary that investigates the birth and death of the electric car, as well as the role of renewable energy and sustainable living in the future.

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Writer:

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ON DISC
4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Narrator (voice)
Reverend Gadget ...
Himself (as Greg 'Gadget' Abbott)
Dave Barthmuss ...
Himself
...
Himself
Jim Boyd ...
Himself
Alec N. Brooks ...
Himself
Alan Cocconi ...
Himself
John R. Dabels ...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Herself
Tom Everhart ...
Himself
David Freeman ...
Himself (as S. David Freeman)
Frank Gaffney ...
Himself (as Frank J. Gaffney Jr.)
...
Himself
Greg Hanssen ...
Himself
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Storyline

With gasoline prices approaching $4/gallon, fossil fuel shortages, unrest in oil producing regions around the globe and mainstream consumer adoption and adoption of the hybrid electric car (more than 140,000 Prius' sold this year), this story couldn't be more relevant or important. The foremost goal in making this movie is to educate and enlighten audiences with the story of this car, its place in history and in the larger story of our car culture and how it enables our continuing addiction to foreign oil. This is an important film with an important message that not only calls to task the officials who squelched the Zero Emission Vehicle mandate, but all of the other accomplices, government, the car companies, Big Oil, even Eco-darling Hydrogen as well as consumers, who turned their backs on the car and embrace embracing instead the SUV. Our documentary investigates the death and resurrection of the electric car, as well as the role of renewable energy and sustainable living in our ... Written by Richard D. Titus

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A lack of consumer confidence... or conspiracy? See more »

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for brief mild language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 August 2006 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Chi ha ucciso l'auto elettrica? - Un giallo che si tinge d'oro nero  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$45,138 (USA) (2 July 2006)

Gross:

$1,677,838 (USA) (12 November 2006)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.75 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The boxy, small EV shown being crushed in the movie was the Honda EV-Plus. They, like the sleek GM EV-1, were only available for lease; several returned to Honda, and were converted into fuel cell demonstration vehicles. For a while, you were able to lease them through EV Rentals (at several Budget Rent a Car locations). See more »

Quotes

Mel Gibson: Who writes the history? Um, well... The guy with the biggest club.
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Soundtracks

Senkl Dala
Written by Aaron Funk
Performed by Venetian Snares
Courtesy of Planet Mu Records
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User Reviews

 
A very good documentary that put its biases up front
15 June 2007 | by (Seattle, Wa.) – See all my reviews

I'm neither a liberal or a conservative (yes, there are other options!)and while I expected to read the usual 'party lines' concerning the politics of this movie ... I was AMAZED at how many people missed the point of the movie. This wasn't, at its heart, a movie about the politics of energy. Rather, it was a human story about people who found, and even fell in love, with a preferred form of transportation, only to have it taken away from them against their will. ***CAUTION --- POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD*** I don't think what I'm about to say will spoil the movie experience, but I decided to play it safe. The most amazing part of the story, to me, concerns the quiet battle between General Motors and the EV1 lessees who wanted desperately to keep their vehicles. Why did GM take such a hard core approach? It seemed to me a more conciliatory approach would have done the embattled auto-maker a world of good. To me, that was the question that drove the story. Yes, most of the people who apparently leased one of GM's electric cars were celebrities and/or people of some measure of wealth. So what? Anyone who likes electronic gadgetry has heard the expression "early adopter," referring to those with money who purchase state-of-the-art equipment at high prices, thereby fueling the development and investment that pushes products to consumer-level pricing. GM's inability to realize this is what makes the whole story fascinating. I encourage anyone who would, to watch the movie closely, and see If this doesn't ring true. Now, having said my piece about the movie, let me throw some comments about energy policy into the fray. 1) We absolutely, positively need gas to reach a price of $5 a gallon or more. Why? Supply and demand. Only when it HURTS to drive a gas guzzler, will most of us finally get off that doomed bandwagon. 2) We had a solution to coal produced electricity in our laps twenty years ago, and a piece of Hollywood drivel ("The China Syndrome")turned us into weenies. Yes, folks, I mean nuclear power. It CAN and IS producing power safely, and environmentally soundly. Just not here in the U.S., by and large. Finally, 3) Supporting the development of electric-only cars is a viable choice. With the improvements being made in solar panel technology, I suspect a working battery-solar hybrid may be a very real option in the NEAR future. If we avoid the stupidity this movie helps us to understand.


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