To bring an end the enmity which has existed between King René, who ruled in Provence in the fifteenth century, and Count Vaudemont, the later gentlemen agreed with the former through their... See full summary »

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(as W. Eugene Moore Jr.)

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(play)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Maude Fealy ...
Iolante, the Blind Girl
Harry Benham ...
Tristan, Count de Vaudemont
Mignon Anderson
David Thompson ...
Ebu Jahia, the Moorish Physician (as David H. Thompson)
William Russell ...
Pierre, Captain of the Guards
Leland Benham
Mrs. Lawrence Marston ...
The Nurse
Robert Broderick ...
King René
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Storyline

To bring an end the enmity which has existed between King René, who ruled in Provence in the fifteenth century, and Count Vaudemont, the later gentlemen agreed with the former through their mediator, the Duke of Burgundy, to betroth his new-born daughter, Iolanthe, to Tristan, the nine-year-old son of the count. Not long after this agreement was made the palace was partly destroyed by fire, and in being rescued by a soldier the baby girl became blind. The king sent to Cordova for a famous physician named Ebu Jahia, who told the father that his daughter should be kept in ignorance of her affliction until she attained the age of sixteen, at which time she would regain the use of her eyes. Acting upon this advice the king built in a secluded spot in his dominion a cottage, where the childhood days of Iolanthe were spent in the company of nobody but her nurse, Martha, and the former's husband, Bertrand, a forester. She was not permitted to receive anybody and even when the king paid her ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama | Romance

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Release Date:

1 July 1913 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Iolanthe  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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A print of this film survives in the Library of Congress. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Welcome to Our Hearts Again, Iolanthe
26 September 2007 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

This elaborate and well-staged silent version of Hertz' play is exceedingly well produced for 1913: it starts off by introducing the actors by name and role, then showing them in double exposure in street clothes and in costumes. The production values are also elaborate and the look of the set designs reminds one of the elaborate backdrops that Melies used in his shots.

However, it also shows the problems that afflicted Thanhouser: the shots are long, static, and all too often, tightly, almost claustrophobically blocked. The acting is stage acting, and even though care is taken with crowd compositions, the effect is occasionally jarring.

Still, the elaborate sets and costumes, as well as the fun of the story moves things right along. Very worthwhile for anyone interested in the evolution of the American movie in this critical period.


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