7.9/10
21
1 user 2 critic

Pulp Fiction Art: Cheap Thrills & Painted Nightmares (2005)

An intimate look at the extraordinary, often ostracized, and now largely forgotten artwork of Pulp Fiction Magazines. For the first time in a documentary film, we take a look at the world ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Robert Anderson ...
Himself - Artist
Charles Ardai ...
Himself - Publisher
Terrence Brown ...
Himself - Director of Society of Illustrators
Ernest Chiracka ...
Himself - Artist
John Desoto ...
Himself
Rafael Desoto ...
Himself - Artist (archive footage)
Steve Kennedy ...
Himself - Art Dealer
Everett Raymond Kinstler ...
Himself - Artist
Robert Lesser ...
Himself - Pulp Expert
Norman Saunders ...
Himself - Artist (archive footage)
Zina Saunders ...
Herself
S.L. Tonik ...
Himself - Dealer / Collector
Robert Weinberg ...
Himself - Pulp Expert
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Storyline

An intimate look at the extraordinary, often ostracized, and now largely forgotten artwork of Pulp Fiction Magazines. For the first time in a documentary film, we take a look at the world of pulp fiction with exclusive images, and interviews with some of the very artists who created these amazing popular culture masterpieces. Written by JEM

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12 December 2005 (Netherlands)  »

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$400,000 (estimated)
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Connections

References Gone with the Wind (1939) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A Loveletter to a Truly American Art Form
27 December 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This charming 1 hour doc will delight anyone interested in graphic illustration, history or the literary arts. Basic background information about the rise, effect and fall of pulp magazines is well-depicted along with some occasionally fascinating archive footage. In particular a home movie interview with Norman Saunders that will leave you an emotional wreck with its honesty and rare Desoto footage that speaks volumes in a two minute clip.

Like any low-budget doc there are some mild technical concerns but generally this 'fact based' documentary hits right on the mark as a pulp art primer and a love letter to a truly American art form. 9 out of 10.


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