6.4/10
19,661
116 user 115 critic

Love in the Time of Cholera (2007)

Florentino, rejected by the beautiful Fermina at a young age, devotes much of his adult life to carnal affairs as a desperate attempt to heal his broken heart.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Gina Bernard Forbes ...
Digna Pardo
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...
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America Vicuña
Juan Ángel ...
Marco Aurelio - 40's
Liliana Gonzalez ...
Marco Aurelio's Wife (as Liliana Alvarez Gonzalez)
Catalina Botero ...
Ofelia Urbino - 40's
Miguel Angel Pazos Galindo ...
Ofelia's Husband
Maria Cecilia Herrera ...
Urbino's Sweet Wife
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Urbino Urbino
Carlos Duplat ...
Mourner
Francisco Raul Linero ...
Mourner
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Florentino - Teen
...
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Storyline

In Colombia just after the Great War, an old man falls from a ladder; dying, he professes great love for his wife. After the funeral, a man calls on the widow - she dismisses him angrily. Flash back more than 50 years to the day Florentino Ariza, a telegraph boy, falls in love with Fermina Daza, the daughter of a mule trader. Ariza is persistent, writing her constantly, serenading, speaking poetically of love. Her father tries to keep them apart, and then, one day, she sees this love as an illusion. She's soon married to Urbino, a cultured physician, and for years, Ariza carries a torch, finding solace in the arms of women, loving none. After Urbino's fall, are Ariza's hopes delusional? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

How long would you wait for love?

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexual content/nudity and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

16 November 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El amor en los tiempos del cólera  »

Box Office

Budget:

$45,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$1,924,860 (USA) (16 November 2007)

Gross:

$4,584,886 (USA) (14 December 2007)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Producer Scott Steindorff spent over 3 years courting Gabriel García Márquez for the rights to the book telling him that he was Florentino and wouldn't give up until he got the rights. See more »

Goofs

A man utters a New Year's speech in which he emphasizes the year 1900 being the beginning of the 20th century. In fact centuries are counted from the year 1 to the full hundred, which makes 1900 the last year of the 19th century. Analogical error was very common in the media in the year 2000. See more »

Quotes

Don Leo: I am not a rich man. I am a poor man with money. There is a difference.
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Connections

Featured in Siskel & Ebert: Episode dated 17 November 2007 (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Pienso En Ti
Performed by Shakira
Courtesy of Epic Records and Sony BMG Music Entertainment (Colombia) S.A.
By Arrangement with Sony BMG Music Entertainment
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User Reviews

Eggs, Planting
20 October 2008 | by (Virginia Beach) – See all my reviews

I think it is possible to make a film that has this book's richnesses, story, metaphors and style. But it would have to depart as much from ordinary Masterpiece TeeVee as this cleaves to it.

The book, if you do not know it, relies on an already deep tradition of Spanish-speaking writers that brings metaphor to life by mixing illusion and reality. This is a third generation writer in this tradition, and he counts on you knowing the previous generations so that you can appreciate the subtle craft in placing both in a "reality."

The centerpiece of course is how to fabricate a perfect love, suspend it in earnest imagination and make it real through writing. That last bit is the third generation bit, the idea that the writing of illusion makes it real. Students of narrative folding as a device to engage will recognize this trick as one designed to put the reader in the story. Everyone in the story is a "reader" of what Florentino writes. His passion in writing is immediately accessible to every other woman he meets and allows him to enter 622 of them.

That number of course is the number of menstrual cycles he waits for his love while engaged in maintaining the passion. This links to one of the two main metaphors, also partly illusory: the boats on the river. The other metaphor is love as a disease and the triangle established by the doctor dedicated to eradicate it. The structure is rather clinical, made attractive by the same passion in its writer as the writer character has. It matters that it is written in Spanish, a language that allows a connected flow of phrases and a tradition that assumes romantic fever.

I think Ruiz could have done this.

Newell has no idea what to do with this, and is left with simply trying lush shots and reading passionate text.

Here's an indication of his general ignorance: for practical commercial reasons the language must be English. But instead of having his characters speak English naturally and with passion, he has them adopt an accent which we will recognize as Hispanic speaking English as a second language. This is characterized by hypervigilance to the consonants separating words where the primary language centers of the brain are telling the speaker that they should flow with sonances. An astute listener (and if you are not, you do not deserve to have passion in reading) will know people with this, whose words flow in their mind, but become discrete pebbles in the mouth, breaking the flow of liquid life this whole story exploits.

Here's an indication of his cinematic ignorance: It matters what is shown, how and in what way, for how long and in what order. He films this as if every element that plays a role in the plot deserves equal weight. Thus, if we have a telegraph key that does something, or a boat people are on, or a ladder that slips, why we see those. All exist with equal weight. All are shown with the same reality and perspective. All have the same frame. But this manner of narrative is all about color and weight, all about the rhythms of love in reality. Some things should be sharp, magnetic, bright. Others foggy or not even touched. Some seemingly full and sensual but allowed to be discovered not so in a way that never informs the next lust.

Its all about rivers and inconsistent flows. All the sex is denoted by displayed breasts. This again is a commercial necessity, but the material is vaginal in focus. Such intense mysteries must always be. All of the mechanics of the story begin and end there, even in mention of the food.

Ted's Evaluation -- 1 of 3: You can find something better to do with this part of your life.


17 of 30 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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