MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 12,357 this week

Life After Tomorrow (2006)

7.3
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.3/10 from 184 users  
Reviews: 3 user | 7 critic

Women who have played orphans in "Annie" are brought together in this documentary.

Watch Trailer
0Check in
0Share...

Watch Now

From $2.99 on Amazon Instant Video

Editors' Spotlight

IMDb Picks: October

IMDb's editors share the movies and TV shows they are excited to see in October.


User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 92 titles
created 11 Jun 2012
 
a list of 1994 titles
created 11 Nov 2012
 
a list of 41 titles
created 5 months ago
 

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Life After Tomorrow (2006)

Life After Tomorrow (2006) on IMDb 7.3/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Life After Tomorrow.
2 wins. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Lucky III (2011)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

A wannabe serial killer wins the lottery and pursues his lifelong crush.

Director: Gil Cates Jr.
Stars: Colin Hanks, Ari Graynor, Jeffrey Tambor
$pent (2000)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4/10 X  

An out-of-work actor uses his skills to con everyone he knows into lending or giving him money to pay off his debts.

Director: Gil Cates Jr.
Stars: Jason London, Charlie Spradling, Phill Lewis
Deal I (2008)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

As an ex-gambler teaches a hot-shot college kid some things about playing cards, he finds himself pulled into the world series of poker, where his protégé is his toughest competition.

Director: Gil Cates Jr.
Stars: Burt Reynolds, Bret Harrison, Maria Mason
Action | Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A lionized account of the life of the martial arts superstar.

Director: Rob Cohen
Stars: Jason Scott Lee, Lauren Holly, Robert Wagner
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Herself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jennine Babo ...
Herself
William Berloni ...
Himself
Theda Stemler Blackwood ...
Herself
...
Herself
Arlene Kulis Brothers ...
Herself
Dara Brown ...
Herself
Nancy Carson ...
Herself
Martin Charnin ...
Himself
Kristi Coombs ...
Herself
Molly Copsey ...
Herself
Michele de Cuir ...
Herself
...
Herself
Robyn Finn ...
Herself (as Robyn Finn-Moosey)
Nicole Francis ...
Herself
Edit

Storyline

What ever happened to the young women who played orphans in the hit Broadway musical Annie? Some went on to fame and fortune, like Sarah Jessica Parker, while others struggled with their "Life After Tomorrow." Find out what happens when orphans grow up. Written by Julie Stevens

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for language including drug and sexual references
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 December 2006 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Both Andrea McArdle, who originated the title role in the original Broadway cast of "Annie", and Aileen Quinn, who played it in the film Annie (1982), declined requests for interviews. See more »

Connections

References Charles in Charge (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

Tomorrow
Music by Charles Strouse
Lyrics by Martin Charnin
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Entertaining, But Needed Much More
5 May 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Mention the phrase "former child star", and I could probably write you a story that could easily fit the "E! True Hollywood Story" mold. Of course, I would need pictures, archive footage, and interviews to make my story look credible. The point is that the story of how a child star won the hearts of America, earned fame and fortune, then when their 15 minutes of fame ended they didn't know what to do with themselves is familiar to everyone. Such a former star turning to drugs, crime, or pornography after the fact is sadly more of a rule than an exception.

"Life After Tomorrow" is unique in the sense that it tells that now-familiar story, but the end results of the women who were interviewed for this documentary are almost never sad. These women, most of whom were no older than 38 when this documentary was released, seem to be all well adjusted after starring in one of the most popular Broadway shows of all time. They coped well with life after their silver platters went away, and it could have been the result of their good, attentive parents. However, after seeing this film, it made me wonder if there were any real tragedies that occurred amongst the women who were not interviewed for this documentary. There must have been some True Hollywood Stories the movie didn't tell us about. If there weren't, that's okay, but I feel as though the movie should have been more honest about the other side of fame following that musical's run.

This movie mostly consists of interviews with women who, when they were young girls, played the parts of Annie or one of the many orphans in the many stage versions of (guess which musical) "Annie". Some girls starred on Broadway, while others were in traveling shows. Julie Stevens, who played an orphan in a national tour, produced and co-directed this documentary. She also provided a brief voice-over introduction, detailing her experiences after her stint in a nutshell. After that, she disappears into the list of interviewees. I wish she had stayed on as the narrator like Michael Moore and Morgan Spurlock have done in their documentaries. It would have made for some more poignant moments that a talking head can't provide. She is also quite pretty, but that's the guy in me talking.

It's actually amazing the amount of women Stevens was able to get to appear in this documentary. Sarah Jessica Parker is among those actresses who is most famous today for playing the title role on Broadway. Despite Parker being the only A-list actress among the interviewees, she is quite humble in her recollection of her childhood role. She doesn't say that it was the best thing for her career, because it may not have been.

Many of the other women carved out respectable careers for themselves, with many outside of show business. I was surprised to see MSNBC anchor Dara Brown being interviewed for this film, because she never struck me as the Broadway type. In fact, most of these women are so down to earth that they don't fit the stereotypical faded Broadway actress a la Norma Desmond of "Sunset Blvd." or, even worse, the title character in "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?".

The stories these women told about their experiences were usually fascinating. They discussed everything from where they grew up to life on the road to the inevitable life after the curtains closed for good. I actually thought the best stories were the ones on the road when they weren't performing. When the child actresses discussed their tutors' educational ritual (or lack thereof, with stories of tutors getting high when they were supposed to be teaching), their stories were a bit sad, but still intriguing.

While this film's strength was in its told stories, its weaknesses were in lack of footage or b- roll. You rarely saw the girls on stage performing, which is understandable since videotape was invented circa 1977-1983, but far more expensive than it is now. However, they could have interspersed film of what the actresses are doing now. There is probably no shortage of Dara Brown footage from MSNBC. There was also a former Annie who is now a rock singer, and another one who impersonates Marilyn Monroe for a living. Such jobs would have made great additions to this documentary. Having chyrons that state what the women do now isn't enough.

The film also suffers from lack of organization. It's called "Life AFTER Tomorrow", but very little of it is focused on these ladies' lives after the show is over. There's also a bit about a man who collects "Annie" memorabilia. He's an interesting character, but irrelevant to what the film should be about. I also found it puzzling that the hit 1982 film based on the show isn't even mentioned here. I doubt it would have been hard to track down Aileen Quinn, either.

The film, whose running time is 73 minutes, definitely needed more of a lot of things. More information, more stock footage, more direction, and many other things that make the difference between a good documentary and a great one. I enjoyed listening to these women's experiences, which is why I'm still recommending the film.


3 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Other casts that imDB forgot. gb-83
Where was Andrea McArdle ? sergeshome
Sarah Navin extrastuff4
great job filmdude15
Life After Tomorrow trailer max-dickinson
Pepper Rules slburkert
Discuss Life After Tomorrow (2006) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page