5.9/10
7,726
39 user 49 critic

The Good Night (2007)

A former pop star who now writes commercial jingles for a living experiences a mid-life crisis.

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Norman
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Karlheinz
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Anna / Melodia
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Mel
Sonia Doubell ...
Shawna
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Alan Weigert
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Victor
Kate Harper ...
Ballet Teacher
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The kitchen chef
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Italian Slickster #2
Martino Lazzeri ...
Italian Slickster #1
Meredith MacNeill ...
Tica
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Storyline

Former British pop star Gary Shaller is at a crossroads in his life: his job in New York City is going nowhere, his American wife, Dora, drives him crazy, and he passed his thirtieth birthday four years ago. Add to that his best friend Paul seems to become more successful every time he breathes. Gary is feeling depressed and dejected... until he meets Anna. She's glamorous and smart; she's seductive and witty. Best of all, she's crazy about Gary. Anna is the girl of Gary's dreams...literally. And that's the problem. Gary can only see Anna in his dream life, so he's got to find a way to carry on the most satisfying relationship of his life, in his dreams. His quest for lucid dreaming techniques introduces Gary to some crazy characters who ultimately give him a new perspective on life. Written by Anonymous

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Dreaming is believing See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some sexual content | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

18 January 2008 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Az álomnő  »

Box Office

Budget:

$15,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$12,377 (USA) (5 October 2007)

Gross:

$20,380 (USA) (12 October 2007)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Simon Pegg and Martin Freeman have appeared together in three other films. Shaun of the Dead (2004), Hot Fuzz (2007), and The World's End (2013). See more »

Quotes

Anna: [Melodia on the street] You're making me feel like I have to break up with you- and I don't even know you!
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Connections

References Gremlins (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

The Universal
Written by Damon Albarn, Graham Coxon, Alex James (as Steven Alexander James) & Dave Rowntree
Performed by The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Courtesy of N2K Publishing Ltd.
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User Reviews

 
Not bad, but victim to a classic blunder
5 September 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Making a movie about dreams or dreaming is tough, and it shows in this one. The difficulty with dreams in any bit of fiction is that they can't be held accountable; that is, by definition, there isn't any kind of direct correspondence between dream occurrences and narrative significance. A dream (singular) here and there can enrich a narrative with symbolism, causality, subconscious, but when the dream becomes plural then almost universally a story starts to break down. Having gritted my teeth through movies like Waking Life and The Cell, to name a few, I've come to associate "dream" with "lazy" in cinema.

That being said, I had to see what Simon Pegg and Martin Freeman would do in a movie together. And the bottom line is, due to these two guys, the movie is worth a watch. Don't may more than $4 to see it.

What you get really is a movie without consequences. You have Martin Freeman obsessed with a dream character. OK, kind of interesting, but there's not enough dimension to his girlfriend (Paltrow), who just seems like a nag, or his friend/former bandmate (Pegg), who, granted, is extremely funny but ultimately without Pathos, to really make his dream obsession a truly engrossing psychological/sociological study.

And again, what happens here is that the dream sequences, and even the obsession with them, because of the, by definition, incommensurable quality of dreams, their inability to be authentically expressed through proxy (language, film, journals, etc.), leave us as audience members bereft of any feeling of causality, arc, or direction.

Also, as a sidenote, the pseudo-documentary format that the film opens with and halfheartedly maintains is confusing and ultimately misdirecting. It ends up looking like the mistake of a novice director.

Martin Freeman performs his lines well, Pegg is funny, DeVito is a pleasing eccentric, and Paltrow isn't as annoying as she usually is (however Cruz is somewhat intolerable), so the movie is worth seeing once, if you've got nothing better to do.


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