MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 121,978 this week

The Sugar Curtain (2005)
"El telón de azúcar" (original title)

7.3
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.3/10 from 75 users   Metascore: 66/100
Reviews: 5 user | 8 critic | 4 from Metacritic.com

A portrayal of the singular experience shared by people of her generation -- those living Cuba's utopian dream during the golden era of the revolution. It is also a lament for the end of that dream, which began to fizzle after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Watch Trailer
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 630 titles
created 26 Oct 2011
 
a list of 1157 titles
created 21 Apr 2012
 
a list of 264 titles
created 16 Jul 2012
 
a list of 1447 titles
created 05 Apr 2013
 
a list of 558 titles
created 2 months ago
 

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Sugar Curtain (2005)

The Sugar Curtain (2005) on IMDb 7.3/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Sugar Curtain.
4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

1 video »
Edit

Storyline

A portrayal of the singular experience shared by people of her generation -- those living Cuba's utopian dream during the golden era of the revolution. It is also a lament for the end of that dream, which began to fizzle after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 October 2007 (France)  »

Also Known As:

The Sugar Curtain  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Nostalgic and unsatisfying home movie
26 December 2006 | by (Toronto, Canada) – See all my reviews

I saw this film at the Toronto International Film Festival. Strangely and almost unintentionally apolitical, this film is a personal remembrance of growing up in the 70s and 80s in Cuba. The director seems to have shot all of the footage herself, making it more like a home movie. And it's incredibly nostalgic, with lots of comparisons of old photos with the present. But the film's thesis, if I can use a word that strong, is impossible to prove in this context, even if it's correct. The director seems to be saying that life in Cuba in her childhood was good, that Castro's revolution was achieving positive results and that the end of the Cold War was disastrous for Cuba. But this is pretty self-evident. We see a lot of run-down or abandoned buildings that were in good repair thirty years ago. We hear interviews with her classmates who agree that things aren't as good anymore. I don't want to sound facetious, but I could probably make a pretty similar film about my own childhood.

When she talks to students at her old high school, about the only privation she can uncover is that they no longer get snacks. In the director's childhood, they got chocolate biscuits and fizzy drinks. But in a society where the government provided so much (and still does, compared with the rest of the world), these examples seem a bit forced. I'm sure life in Cuba is difficult for many, but from the evidence of the film, it still seems to be doing pretty well. For a society that has withstood a trade embargo from the world's richest nation for more than fifty years, and whose biggest benefactor cut it off more than fifteen years ago, it's doing remarkably well. Its children are literate and fed, and it seems to have avoided the extremes of poverty seen in many parts of the Caribbean and Latin America.

Unfortunately, I think the director's complaints are fairly universal. The idealism we feel in our youth turns into disillusionment as we age. The forces of globalization and capitalism are affecting Cuba, even as Castro tries to hold them at bay. The fact that the director and many of her classmates left Cuba in the 1990s (during the "Special Period" that followed the end of the Cold War, a time of tremendous economic hardship for Cubans) also clouds the picture. How does her memory of Cuba as a socialist paradise differ from the memories of the anti- Castro crowd in Miami, who remember pre-revolutionary Cuba as a different kind of paradise? Both are unreliable and nostalgic.

While the film was enjoyable as a window into one person's experience, and it was great to see the modern footage of life on the island, overall I found it unsatisfying.


13 of 18 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Paraíso Perdido rrosen2727
Discuss The Sugar Curtain (2005) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page