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The Prestige (2006) Poster

(2006)

Trivia

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Chung Ling Soo was a stage character created by a Caucasian American man, William Ellsworth Robinson, who disguised himself as a Chinese man to cash in on audiences' enthusiasm for the exotic. Robinson lived as Chung, never breaking character while in public. He died in March 1918 when a bullet catch trick went wrong. "My God, I've been shot" were both his last words and the first English he had spoken on stage in nineteen years.
Nikola Tesla was a world-renowned inventor, physicist, and engineer. For a while, he conducted electrical experiments at his lab in Colorado Springs, where he was also known for his eccentric behavior.
Sam Mendes had shown interest in adapting Christopher Priest's novel for the big-screen, but Priest insisted that Christopher Nolan direct the film, based on his love for both Following (1998) and Memento (2000).
The Prestige is one of three 2006 films to feature both the topic of magic and magicians as main characters. The other two are The Illusionist (2006) and Scoop (2006), the second of which also stars Hugh Jackman and Scarlett Johansson.
Borden's infant is played by one of director Christopher Nolan's children.
The main characters' initials spell ABRA (Alfred Borden Robert Angier), as in Abracadabra, a common word used by magicians.
Ricky Jay, who played a magician in the film, coached Hugh Jackman and Christian Bale in their sleight-of-hand techniques.
The word "prestige" originally meant a trick, from the Latin "praestigium," meaning "illusion."
When Andy Serkis' character is first introduced, he makes a reference to a magic trick where you guess the item in a person's pocket. This is the exact same trick that fooled Serkis' character Gollum in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012).
Alfred Borden takes on the stage name of "The Professor." This is the nickname that was given to Dai Vernon, the man many consider to be the best modern day sleight of hand magician.
In the Bullet Catch scene, you can clearly see the name Harry Dresden on the list of performers under "The Professor." Harry Dresden is a fictional wizard in "The Dresden Files," a series of books by novelist Jim Butcher, and later the basis of The Dresden Files (2007).
Scarlett Johansson and Rebecca Hall also appeared together in Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008). Furthermore, they both later joined the Marvel franchise and both had their Marvel-debut in an Iron Man (2008) sequel.
Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die," edited by Steven Schneider.
Six of the film's stars have played roles in several comic book films. Both Christian Bale and Michael Caine have appeared as Batman and Alfred respectively in Christopher Nolan's own "Dark Knight Trilogy." Hugh Jackman played Wolverine in the X-Men franchise. Scarlett Johansson played Black Widow in the Marvel Cinematic Universe franchise. Rebecca Hall appeared as Maya Hansen in Iron Man 3 (2013). Andy Serkis played Captain Haddock in The Adventures of Tintin (2011), as well as Ulysses Klaue in Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015).
One of two movies released in the fall of 2006 to star Hugh Jackman and Andy Serkis. The other is Flushed Away (2006).
This is one of two Christopher Nolan's movies in which a character has a two-head coin, the other one being The Dark Knight, in which Harvey Dent/Two-Face has one, used to decide his fate or the fate of his victims.
The film cast includes two Oscar winners, Christian Bale and Michael Caine, and one Oscar nominee, Hugh Jackman.
Josh Hartnett was considered for the part of Robert Angier.
Christian Bale's character is named Alfred. In the Batman films, Christian Bale's butler is played by Michael Caine, who is also named Alfred.
This is not the first film where Scarlett Johansson has played a homewrecker. She also played one in He's Just Not That Into You (2009) and Match Point (2005).
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Sarah's line, "I know what you are," was not in the script. Rebecca Hall said that she felt terrible right after she said it, thinking she had given away the ending.
Early on in the movie, Sarah's nephew asks of the bird, "Where's his brother?" It is a clear foreshadowing of the fact that Borden has a twin brother.
When Nikola Tesla's machines are being exhibited in the Royal Albert Hall, a man in the audience protests that Tesla's electrical current is unstable. Later in the movie, the same man appears in Colorado Springs as one of Thomas A. Edison's henchmen, thus proving that magicians are not the only ones who hide within their rivals' audiences.
Root, the on-stage double of Angier (Hugh Jackman), announces that he has played Faust and Caesar in the past. Both were famously portrayed on stage as men destroyed by their own ambition, as Angier eventually is.
The use of twins in a "transported man" magic show was, in fact, quite common when the movie takes place.
Angier's double mumbles a few lines from a speech while rehearsing on stage before his first performance. What he is saying is actually the words of Harry Percy (Hotspur) from William Shakespeare's Henry IV, when called to appear before the king and explain his failure to turn over prisoners after a recent battle in Scotland. Apparently, Hugh Jackman has used this speech in previous auditions. Presumably, it was believed that having the double deliver a few lines from Shakespeare would lend him an actorly air, as his character is, in fact, a dissolute stage actor.
There is a clue to the fact that Christian Bale's character, Borden, has a double, early on in the movie, when he says, "I would not forgive 'myself' for selling my own trick," when referring to Fallon's decision not to sell the Transported Man secret to Owens. He should have said, "I would not forgive 'him' for selling my own trick," but as Fallon is a double of Borden, then he is referring to him as himself.
The editing includes 146 time jump cuts, in which the next shot either flashes back or skips ahead to another time period of the storyline. This averages to almost one timeline jump per minute of film.
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