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1  
1959  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Thomas Heathcote ...
 Silas Sutherland (5 episodes, 1959)
Brenda Dunrich ...
 Polly Sutherland (5 episodes, 1959)
Ann Hanslip ...
 Alice Sutherland (5 episodes, 1959)
Joseph Layode ...
 Scipio (5 episodes, 1959)
Derek Aylward ...
 Brayton Ripley (5 episodes, 1959)
...
 Mul-keep-mo (5 episodes, 1959)
James Alexander
(5 episodes, 1959)
Sidney Calvin
(5 episodes, 1959)
(5 episodes, 1959)
James Fitzgerald
(5 episodes, 1959)
Leslie Goby
(5 episodes, 1959)
Ray Marioni
(5 episodes, 1959)
Norman Morris
(5 episodes, 1959)
Nicholas Shiafkalis
(5 episodes, 1959)
Edward Vaughan-Scott
(5 episodes, 1959)
...
 Haw-hu-da (4 episodes, 1959)
...
 Simon Kenton (4 episodes, 1959)
Bruce Stewart ...
 The Owl (3 episodes, 1959)
...
 Hugh Sutherland (3 episodes, 1959)
Alan Browning ...
 Captain of the Fort (3 episodes, 1959)
(3 episodes, 1959)
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Genres:

Drama | Western

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Release Date:

4 January 1959 (UK)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(5 Episodes)
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This series is believed to be lost. See more »

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User Reviews

 
A shame this series is lost
8 October 2013 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

I remember watching this series avidly as a schoolboy and I was saddened to learn no copy of it remains. Although filmed entirely in the studio the story line about a group of settlers defending their home in 18th century Canada was so good that the wobbly trees and fake log cabin were easily ignored after all we had much less sophisticated tastes compared to the youngsters of today. We loved the musket flashes and the smoke and the tomahawks and bows and arrows, all brilliant stuff for us boys. Filmed and broadcast in black and white to our twelve inch, 405 line televisions the visual quality was not good but we could forgive all that back in the fifties. TV for the masses had yet to arrive in the UK and my Mum often gave "tea" to friends who had no television of their own and who came to our house to watch. Great stuff and a shame no copy survives.


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