Crips and Bloods: Made in America (2008) - News Poster

News

The Chainsmokers And Los Angeles Youth Network Announce Partnership

Los Angeles Youth Network (Layn) is proud to announce a new partnership from the Grammy Award winning artist/producer duo The Chainsmokers.

The donation will help fund Layn’s services for homeless and foster youth in Los Angeles. The donation will help in the vital services including emergency shelter, transitional housing, education and job development, health and wellness, and aftercare program.

“The issues facing the youth served by Layn are not insurmountable and we knew we could help,” said Taggart. “These homeless, runaway and foster youth are bright, intelligent and have determination to achieve their goals and Layn is there alongside them to motivate and inspire them,” Taggart added. “The issues facing these youth seem daunting, but we are happy to support this cause and Layn in its mission to create permanent solutions for these young people.”

“We are honored that Alex and Andrew chose Layn as their charity of choice,
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Jay-z Leads Concert Fans in Singing 'Happy Birthday' to Beyonce

  • TMZ
[[tmz:video id="0_wxgocpnr"]] Jay-z let his fans do the heavy lifting for Beyonce's birthday -- getting the crowd at his Made in America festival to to serenade her. Bey was in the audience Sunday night in Philly when Jay-z led everyone into "Happy Birthday" in honor of his wife's 36th ... which is actually on Monday.  As often happens ... fans sounded torn on which version of the song to sing -- traditional or Stevie Wonder. Beyonce smiled through
See full article at TMZ »

'We can't wait for Hollywood to change' - the directors reframing black history

From Raoul Peck’s I Am Not Your Negro to Ava DuVernay’s 13th, the factual film-makers tackling race in the era of Black Lives Matter

Related: Did #OscarsSoWhite work? Looking beyond Hollywood's diversity drought

Despite its best attempts to sabotage the occasion by almost crowning the wrong movie, this year’s Oscars will go down in history in terms of diversity, primarily thanks to Moonlight. But there was one Oscar category that had a different diversity problem. Four out of the five films competing for best documentary feature were made by African-Americans: Ezra Edelman’s winning Oj: Made in America; Raoul Peck’s I Am Not Your Negro; Ava DuVernay’s 13th; and Roger Ross Williams’s Life, Animated. The marginalised white film-making community had to make do with the Italian entry, Gianfranco Rosi’s immigration film Fire at Sea, which was still about Africans.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Arthouse Audit: ‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Soars as ‘Kedi’ Continues Strong

  • Indiewire
A successful Oscar season is wrapping up, as multiple contenders from the specialty world continuing their long runs. Last out of the gate is Documentary Feature contender “I Am Not Your Negro” (Magnolia) which is rapidly expanding far beyond most similar nominees in an era when most documentaries do not play outside their Oscar-qualifying theatrical runs.

Among limited films, the new releases are mainly niche items without high expectations, and will add little in upcoming weeks. However, strong new Los Angeles dates on the second week of cat documentary “Kedi” (Oscilloscope) showed that its big New York opening was no fluke.

Opening

Everybody Loves Somebody (Lionsgate) – Metacritic: 74; Festivals include: Palm Springs 2017

$1,000,000 in 333 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $3,003,000

The second 2017 release from Lionsgate’s Mexico producing partner Pantelion is a rom-com with a rare female director for this commercial general (mostly Latino) audience. Bilingual, it centers on an Los Angeles-based
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Oj: Made in America’ Will Win the Best Documentary Oscar — Here’s Why

‘Oj: Made in America’ Will Win the Best Documentary Oscar — Here’s Why
As usual, the five nominees in the fiercely competitive Best Documentary Oscar category are comprised of high-profile hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas. However, this year’s race was marked by outside factors that included #OscarsSoWhite and the election of President Donald Trump. (Of note: Filmmakers of color directed four of the five nominated feature documentaries.)

Here’s how the documentary race shakes out:

O.J.: Made in America” (Ezra Edelman, Espn, May 20)

Scoring great reviews at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival was Ezra Edelman’s five-part movie “O.J.: Made in America,” an exhaustive, eye-opening examination of O.J. Simpson and race relations in Los Angeles from the ’60s through the Trial of the Century and beyond.

The movie swept through awards groups: it won three Cinema Eye Honors awards, took home the Ida for Best Feature, the Gotham, the National Board of Review, National Society of Film Critics,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Oj: Made in America’ Will Win the Best Documentary Oscar — Here’s Why

  • Indiewire
‘Oj: Made in America’ Will Win the Best Documentary Oscar — Here’s Why
As usual, the five nominees in the fiercely competitive Best Documentary Oscar category are comprised of high-profile hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas. However, this year’s race was marked by outside factors that included #OscarsSoWhite and the election of President Donald Trump. (Of note: Filmmakers of color directed four of the five nominated feature documentaries.)

Here’s how the documentary race shakes out:

O.J.: Made in America” (Ezra Edelman, Espn, May 20)

Scoring great reviews at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival was Ezra Edelman’s five-part movie “O.J.: Made in America,” an exhaustive, eye-opening examination of O.J. Simpson and race relations in Los Angeles from the ’60s through the Trial of the Century and beyond.

The movie swept through awards groups: it won three Cinema Eye Honors awards, took home the Ida for Best Feature, the Gotham, the National Board of Review, National Society of Film Critics,
See full article at Indiewire »

From Kelly Ripa vs. Michael Strahan to 'Criminal Minds': The 11 Biggest TV Stories of 2016

From Kelly Ripa vs. Michael Strahan to 'Criminal Minds': The 11 Biggest TV Stories of 2016
2016 has been quite an eventful year in television.

From shocking firings and abrupt morning show departures to the rise of true-crime and president-elect Donald Trump, the past 12 months have featured a myriad of major TV headlines.

As 2017 approaches, Et relives 11 of the biggest stories on the small screen.

1. Thomas Gibson’s Criminal Minds Firing

The longtime star, who played Aaron Hotchner since the series’ 2005 debut, was fired after allegedly kicking a writer on the set of the CBS procedural, prompting the writers to scramble for an appropriate resolution to his character’s abrupt exit. Ultimately, the show opted not to kill Hotchner, leaving the door open for a possible return in the future.

Related: How 'Criminal Minds' Handled Thomas Gibson's Final Episode

2. The Year of Trump TV

You couldn’t turn away from the TV without seeing or hearing mention of Donald Trump. Whether it be through the presidential debates, the fallout
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Walter Scott Shooting Revisited: How This Oscar-Shortlisted Doc Shook Up a National Story

Few recent images have shocked America as much as the shaky cell phone video of Charleston police officer Michael Slager shooting unarmed Walter Scott in the back eight times. Cable news analysis of the video painted a black-and-white picture of a corrupt cop, who after radioing in that Scott had grabbed his taser — supposedly justifying the shooting — initially tried to plant his taser next to Scott’s dead body. It’s story that culminated this week when the trial led to a hung jury.

Read More: Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast: ‘Oj: Made in America’ Director Ezra Edelman on Making an Eight Hour Oscar Contender (Episode 11)

Young Canadian cinematographer Daniel Voshart, who had developed his own technique for image stabilization, instantly started playing with the shaky footage when it hit the internet. In the immediate aftermath of the shooting he produced a small clip, that was steadier and sharper compared to what had been made publicly available.
See full article at Indiewire »

Critics, SAG Will Set the Tone as Oscar Race Heats Up

Critics, SAG Will Set the Tone as Oscar Race Heats Up
In the coming weeks, various critics groups, as well as the Screen Actors Guild, will set a more definitive tone for this year’s Oscar race. The influence of the critics is great: They can rally behind strong contenders and establish them as frontrunners, or they can revive the chances of fringe hopefuls looking for a foothold.

On Dec. 1, the New York Film Critics Circle will meet to deliberate the best of the year. They’ll be joined by their West Coast counterparts, the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn., three days later. Throughout the rest of the month, various regional groups will chip in with their assessments, building toward something resembling a consensus.

The most critically acclaimed films so far, according to the Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes websites, are “Moonlight” and “Manchester by the Sea.” Those movies were already expected to register with

Oscar voters.

Where critics could really push
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars 2017 Documentary Shortlist Predictions: Anne Thompson Weighs In With Top Picks

Oscars 2017 Documentary Shortlist Predictions: Anne Thompson Weighs In With Top Picks
Many are called, few are chosen: The number of high-quality, awards-worthy documentaries seems to grow every year, but there’s still only 15 slots on the Oscar documentary shortlist. That will be announced December 5; the final five will be revealed on nominations morning, January 24. This year, 145 features were submitted.

This is the white-knuckle portion of the final campaign stretch, as documentary filmmakers and distributors hope their movies make it onto documentary branch voters’ viewing piles before they file their final grades. Those with the advantage are high-profile established hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of engaging accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas.

So what’s looking like a strong bet? It’s a diverse list in more ways than one. Here are my picks for the Top 15, which are not listed in order of likelihood.

See more ‘Amanda Knox’: Why It Took Five Years to Unravel the Story of
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscars 2017 Documentary Shortlist Predictions: Anne Thompson Weighs In With Top Picks

  • Indiewire
Oscars 2017 Documentary Shortlist Predictions: Anne Thompson Weighs In With Top Picks
Many are called, few are chosen: The number of high-quality, awards-worthy documentaries seems to grow every year, but there’s still only 15 slots on the Oscar documentary shortlist. That will be announced December 5; the final five will be revealed on nominations morning, January 24. This year, 145 features were submitted.

This is the white-knuckle portion of the final campaign stretch, as documentary filmmakers and distributors hope their movies make it onto documentary branch voters’ viewing piles before they file their final grades. Those with the advantage are high-profile established hits and festival award-winners with the right combination of engaging accessibility, artful filmmaking, and gravitas.

So what’s looking like a strong bet? It’s a diverse list in more ways than one. Here are my picks for the Top 15, which are not listed in order of likelihood.

See more ‘Amanda Knox’: Why It Took Five Years to Unravel the Story of
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc NYC 2016: 13 Movies We Can’t Wait to See at the Festival

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2016: 13 Movies We Can’t Wait to See at the Festival
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, including a full-to-bursting slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features.

Ahead, we pick out 13 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including some awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts and a number of festival favorites. Take a look and start filling up your schedule now.

Cameraperson

Kirsten Johnson’s “visual memoir” has already completed a starry trot around the festival circuit, kicking off with a lauded debut at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, but it still demands to be seen by a wider audience. Johnson made her bones as a cinematographer on a number of well-known (and well-loved) documentaries,
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc NYC Pro: Learn Documentary Essentials from the Filmmakers Behind this Year’s Best Films

For one week in November, virtually the entire documentary film community will gather in New York City for the Doc NYC film festival, where this year’s most acclaimed non-fiction films will screen. With all that talent and experience gathered in one place, Doc NYC has decided to channel it toward a new eight-day conference focusing on the tools and skills needed to fund, create and distribute documentary films.

Read More: ‘Weiner,’ Yes; ‘The Eagle Huntress,’ No: The 15 Documentaries on the Doc NYC Short List

Doc NYC Pro is geared toward documentary professionals looking to advance their careers and filmmaking skills and will be comprised of talks, panels, masterclasses and pitch sessions featuring filmmakers and decision makers behind films like “Weiner,” “O.J.: Made in America,” “Amanda Knox” and “Cartel Land.”

Each day of Doc NYC Pro will begin with a “morning manifesto,” featuring speakers Laura Poitras (“Citizenfour”), Josh Kriegman and
See full article at Indiewire »

Michael B. Jordan, Danny Glover and More Star in Powerful Police Violence PSA

Michael B. Jordan, Danny Glover and More Star in Powerful Police Violence PSA
Civil rights activist Harry Belafonte released a social justice short film, titled “Against the Wall,” highlighting police brutality towards African Americans. Directed by Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz, the video features stars like Michael B. Jordan, Danny Glover, Michael K. Williams, and many others, forced against a wall, as audio of police calls and shooting incidents play in the background.

“If it’s once or twice you can say it’s an accident or a coincidence, but when you have as large a population of murdered young men in the streets of America and they’re all black or of African American descent, I think someone is sending us a message,” we hear Belafonte saying in the opening credits. “And we should respond to that message.”

Read More: From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’ to ‘Oj: Made in America’: Four Docs That Define Black Lives Matter

The chilling black-and-white video
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars: ‘Newtown’ Returns Gun Debate to Documentary Race, 14 Years After ‘Bowling for Columbine’

Oscars: ‘Newtown’ Returns Gun Debate to Documentary Race, 14 Years After ‘Bowling for Columbine’
In his Oscar-winning documentary “Bowling for Columbine” (2002), Michael Moore confronts Charlton Heston and Kmart executives, Michigan militiamen and the producer of “Cops,” but his quixotic search is for the structure itself, the undercarriage of American violence. Though his starting point is the 1999 massacre at Colorado’s Columbine High School, in which two students murdered one teacher, 12 classmates, and injured 21 others, Moore spins a dense web of historical connections and geopolitical comparisons: A montage of American imperialism from the overthrow of Mohammed Mossedegh to the rise of Osama bin Laden, set to “What a Wonderful World”; interviews with ordinary Canadians baffled by the American obsession with crime. “Bowling for Columbine” is, in short, the filmmaker’s most chilling and prescient polemic, framing the United States’ gun epidemic as the logical consequence of our “culture of fear,” and its concomitant economy of terror.

Nearly 14 years on from Moore’s Oscar acceptance speech,
See full article at Indiewire »

Kristen Stewart On Choosing Her Roles and ‘Making Good Sh*t’ – Nyff 2016

  • Indiewire
Kristen Stewart On Choosing Her Roles and ‘Making Good Sh*t’ – Nyff 2016
Kristen Stewart may seem to have turned a corner in her career by transitioning from big-budget studio movies to independent films, but Stewart insists she doesn’t prefer one over the other. During Monday’s New York Film Festival press conference for director Kelly Reichardt’s “Certain Women,” a drama in which Stewart plays a young lawyer, she told the audience she never focuses on the difference between doing an indie film or a studio movie.

Read More: Kelly Reichardt Is One of the Best Filmmakers in America, and We Don’t Appreciate Her Enough — Nyff

“You could technically draw distinctions, because you have more money to play with and then it naturally affects the dynamic a little bit,” Stewart said, “but at the end of the day, I’ve never approached anything [thinking], oh, this is bigger now, therefore I’m less entitled to something meaningful.”

In “Certain Women,” which
See full article at Indiewire »

From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’ to ‘Oj: Made in America’: Four Docs That Define Black Lives Matter

From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’ to ‘Oj: Made in America’: Four Docs That Define Black Lives Matter
There are four new documentaries that, while timed for Oscar votes, have a much bigger target audience: The American voters. These urgently topical films peel away decades of mythology, propaganda, and misinformation to reveal why so many people in this country are not only incarcerated in our thriving prison economy, but function inside prisons of misguided perception.

It’s easy to see why the New York Film Festival picked Ava DuVernay’s “13th” as its first-ever documentary opening-night film. In the year of Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, as fearful cops continue to gun down unarmed black men in the street, this must-see film will raise consciousness about how race affects the way we regard and behave toward the people around us. “13th” is a history of how white people have treated African-Americans since 1865 — when the 13th Amendment abolished slavery — and it roused the Lincoln Center crowd to multiple standing
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’ to ‘Oj: Made in America’: Four Docs That Define Black Lives Matter

From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’ to ‘Oj: Made in America’: Four Docs That Define Black Lives Matter
There are four new documentaries that, while timed for Oscar votes, have a much bigger target audience: The American voters. These urgently topical films peel away decades of mythology, propaganda, and misinformation to reveal why so many people in this country are not only incarcerated in our thriving prison economy, but function inside prisons of misguided perception.

It’s easy to see why the New York Film Festival picked Ava DuVernay’s “13th” as its first-ever documentary opening-night film. In the year of Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, as fearful cops continue to gun down unarmed black men in the street, this must-see film will raise consciousness about how race affects the way we regard and behave toward the people around us. “13th” is a history of how white people have treated African-Americans since 1865 — when the 13th Amendment abolished slavery — and it roused the Lincoln Center crowd to multiple standing
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc Corner: 'O.J.: Made in America' a Compelling Success

Glenn here with our weekly look at documentaries from theatres, festivals, and on demand. This week we're looking at Espn's much-buzzed five-part documentary about O.J. Simpson.

Even more coincidental than the release of Espn’s O.J.: Made in America so soon after Ryan Murphy’s star-studded FX mini-series, The People v. O.J. Simpson, is that the rise to fame of their subject coincided so precisely with the rise to prominence of the African American civil rights movement. The irony was not lost on Simpson with the handsome man who everyone thought “had it all” never being able to out-run the shadow that his own meteoric ascent cast over seemingly the United States’ entire black population. Nor is it lost on director Ezra Edelman who makes the parallels the structural spine of this exceptionally thorough, exquisitely compiled, and exhaustively compelling five-part documentary. It’s not called “Made in America” for nothing
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ron Howard’s Devotion to Storytelling Earns Him a Walk of Fame Star

Ron Howard’s Devotion to Storytelling Earns Him a Walk of Fame Star
Over the course of a 30-year career behind the camera, Ron Howard has released an array of films, from such dramas as “A Beautiful Mind” and “Frost/Nixon” to action films like “Backdraft,” comedies such as “Parenthood” and those that touch on several genres at once, like “Apollo 13.” His latest, “In the Heart of the Sea,” opening Dec. 11, examines issues of morality and spirit within the context of a historical seafaring epic.

This fascination with multiple platforms for storytelling has earned Howard box office success, as well as two Oscars, four Emmys, a Directors Guild of America Award and a host of additional laurels, including his second star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame that he will receive Dec. 10.

If there’s a unifying element in Howard’s film career, it is his adherence to the story at the core of each project.

“I’m always attracted to stories on a thematic level,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites