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2018 Oscar nominations surprise: Jake Gyllenhaal, Patrick Stewart, Robert Pattinson or …? [Poll]

2018 Oscar nominations surprise: Jake Gyllenhaal, Patrick Stewart, Robert Pattinson or …? [Poll]
We previously asked readers which actress they thought would score the most shocking Oscar nomination. A performer who may have garnered early critical support but saw their Oscar hopes dimmed when industry groups forgot about them. And now it’s time to look at which men in the race could pull off a similar feat.

Past examples of men who defied the odds include Tommy Lee Jones (“In the Valley of Elah”), virtually absent from awards chatter, with only a couple small critics groups nominating him. Somehow he muscled his way to a surprise Best Actor Oscar nomination. Industry groups like SAG and BAFTA have similarly ignored plenty of strong performances this year. Take a look at five such actors and vote in our poll below to let us know which actor you think will be this year’s most shocking nomination.

Discuss All the Oscar contenders with Hollywood insiders
See full article at Gold Derby »

The 80th Academy Awards: If I had been a voter

Here we go again folks! As promised (though perhaps a bit later than initially planned), I’m diving back into the world of previous Oscar ceremonies. This time, I have my sights set on the 80th Academy Awards ceremony. You should know the drill by now. I’m going to state what I would have picked in the major eight categories if I had been lucky enough to have been able to vote. In most cases, it deviates from the actual winner. You’ll see how much that was the case this time around, and sit tight, as I do hope to make this a bit more of a consistent thing (excuse the gap again) and really go back as far as I can go. Until then, just enjoy this new one… Alright then, once again here goes nothing ladies and gentlemen…behold my picks for this particular ceremony: Best
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

No Matter How Well Made, Bigelow Depiction of Detroit Rebellion Both Condescending and Self-Serving

No Matter How Well Made, Bigelow Depiction of Detroit Rebellion Both Condescending and Self-Serving
Detroit movie street riot scene: The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty director Kathryn Bigelow tackles the 1967 Detroit riots in “horribly real” and “deeply self-serving” 2017 release marketed as a “dramatic thriller.” Kathryn Bigelow's 'Detroit' movie: Horribly real semidocumentary or self-serving Hollywood depiction of 1967 Detroit Rebellion? In the city of Detroit, from July 23 through July 27 of 1967, the people rebelled against the conditions of their existence. Some call this the 1967 Detroit Riot; it's also known as the 12th Street Riot and the 1967 Detroit Rebellion. I prefer the latter. During the rebellion, 43 people died – 33 of whom were black, 10 were white. Twenty-four of the black victims were shot by police officers and National Guardsmen, while six were shot by store owners or security guards. Three of those killings are the subject of Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow, her itinerant The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty scenario writer Mark Boal (who also wrote Paul Haggis' In the Valley of Elah), and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Jonathan Tucker

Jonathan Tucker has joined the Season 2 Westworld cast in the recurring role of a military commanding officer, Major Craddock. The recent announcement was accompanied by a photo of the dark-haired Tucker; eyes piercing and countenance intriguing. His image is yet another confirmation of his reputation for chameleon-like powers of transformation. He has taken on many different roles since he entered his acting career. Tucker’s best known for his movie roles in The Ruins, The Virgin Suicides, In the Valley of Elah, Hostage, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. He has 23 film credits and 22 television credits to his name.

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Jonathan Tucker
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Movie Review: Doug Liman’s wartime sniper drama The Wall hits its mark when trusting its action

Directed by Doug Liman (Edge Of Tomorrow) from a script off of Hollywood’s famous Black List of un-produced screenplays, The Wall presents America’s protracted war in Iraq in primally simple terms: two U.S. soldiers fighting (and maybe dying) for reasons they can’t articulate, pinned down by an enemy they can’t see or understand. In its white-knuckle economy, the film breaks from the limply well-meaning Hollywood polemics that marched steadily into theaters a decade ago, like waves of advancing troops. The problem with Lions For Lambs or In The Valley Of Elah or Stop-Loss was that they were so busy functioning as screeds—abstracting the war itself into outraged talking points—that they forgot to function as, well, movies. In its best moments, The Wall is just a movie, a tense and nasty black-box thriller that conveys its politics through the microcosmic stakes of its life-and-death
See full article at The AV Club »

Mark Boal And Megan Ellison Creating Series About The Us Election

It was only a matter of time before somebody in Hollywood went to work on the 2016 U.S Presidential Election – beyond spirited speeches at awards ceremonies, that is. Unsurprisingly, it seems that among the first out of the gate will be a project created by Mark Boal and Megan Ellison – the writer-producer team behind Zero Dark Thirty. The surprising part is that this project is being envisioned as a series, rather than a feature film.

For her part, producer Megan Ellison – an Academy Award nominee – has built an impressive career bringing a diverse range of films to the big screen. Her resume includes notable titles such as True Grit, Zero Dark Thirty, The Master, Her, American Hustle, Foxcatcher, The Bad Batch, Everybody Wants Some!!, and 20th Century Women. For his part, freelance journalist-turned-screenwriter Mark Boal has made it his business to bring challenging, real subject matter to the big screen,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Anti-Art Criticism, “In the Age of Trump”

The joke between me and my Sundance roommate/colleague was that every review and write-up would contain the phrase “In the age of Trump.” Another phrase to watch out for is “now more than ever,” spoken verbatim twice during this year’s Sundance acceptance speeches. The proposition that independent film will “lead the resistance” against Our 45th President is a dubious one: I don’t remember The Lucky Ones or In the Valley of Elah helping anything in particular. The repeated invocation of certain dead phrases to summon up a spell against the darkness inevitably and a bit boringly brings to mind Orwell’s “Politics and the English Language,” […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘The Expanse’ Season 2 Trailer: The Sci-fi Conspiracy Series Returns for an All New Mission on Syfy

  • Indiewire
‘The Expanse’ Season 2 Trailer: The Sci-fi Conspiracy Series Returns for an All New Mission on Syfy
The Syfy original series “The Expanse” wrapped up its first season this past February, and now a second season will soon be upon us. Set in a future where humanity colonized the Solar System, the series follows a United Nations executive (Shohreh Aghdashloo), a police detective (Thomas Jane), a ship officer (Steven Strait) and his crew as they unravel a conspiracy that threatens the fate of their system. The series co-stars Cas Anvar (“Argo”), Dominique Tipper (“Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”), Wes Chatham (“In the Valley of Elah”), Florence Faivre (“The Following”) and Shawn Doyle (“Fargo”). Watch a trailer for the new season below.

Read More: Review: ‘The Expanse’ Season 1 Has Totally Changed the Game for Sci-Fi on TV

The series is developed by Mark Fergus and Hawk Ostby, best known for contributing to the screenplays for “Children of Men,” for which they were nominated for an Oscar,
See full article at Indiewire »

16th Marrakech Film Festival Wraps With a Reinforced World Cinema Imprint

16th Marrakech Film Festival Wraps With a Reinforced World Cinema Imprint
Marrakech, Morocco — The 16th Marrakech film fest wraps today, Saturday, with the closing ceremony featuring Fatih Akin’s “Goodbye Berlin” and announcement of the films that will win the Golden Star for best film and the best actor and best actress.

This year’s edition had a very strong world cinema imprint, highly influenced by the country tribute to Russian cinema and the choice of iconoclastic Hungarian filmmaker, Bela Tara, as jury prexy.

The career tributes and masterclasses featured outspoken filmmakers, who have provoked controversy in their home countries and in several cases have moved abroad to maintain their creative independence.

Tarr proudly described himself as one Hungary’s “top five black sheep” and has spent the last five years running his Film Factory school in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where he encourages his students to hunt in order to “capture life” in their films.

Paul Verhoeven, who this week was confirmed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Paul Haggis on Projects ‘Ship Breaker’ and ‘Ranger’s Apprentice’

Paul Haggis on Projects ‘Ship Breaker’ and ‘Ranger’s Apprentice’
Marrakech, Morocco — The first screenwriter to pen two consecutive best picture Academy Award winners – “Million Dollar Baby” and “Crash” – Canadian Paul Haggis visited the 16th Marrakech Film Festival to provide a masterclass. Dividing his time between New York and Los Angeles, Haggis begun his career in TV, in the early 1980s. His career has breadth: Think Videogame “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3”, “007: Quantum of Solace” and “007: Casino Royale,” “72 Horas” and “In the Valley of Elah.”

That said, his works often include elements of social and political criticism, such as his jaundiced view of the Iraq war in “In the Valley of Elah,” starring Tommy Lee Jones, Charlize Theron, James Franco and Susan Sarandon, and criticism of stereotypical racist attitudes in “Crash.” Haggis is the founder of Artists for Peace and Justice, that has united artists to build schools and medical clinics in Haiti. At Marrakech, Haggis also talked
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Paul Haggis to Produce Flint Water Crisis Documentary ‘Lead and Copper’

  • Indiewire
Paul Haggis to Produce Flint Water Crisis Documentary ‘Lead and Copper’
After writing and directing films about such pressing topics as racism (“Crash”) and the Iraq War (“In the Valley of Elah”), Paul Haggis has set his gaze on the Flint water crisis for his next project. The two-time Oscar winner and his producing partner Michael Nozik are collaborating with director William Hart on “Lead and Copper,” which will examine the crisis afflicting the Michigan city’s water supply. Deadline first broke the news.

Read More: Flint Water Crisis Movie in the Works at Lifetime, Based on Time Magazine Cover Story

“Once I learned of the depth of the problem and the extent of the cover-up, I was compelled to take a closer look and tell this story in the way it deserved to be told,” says Hart in a statement. Flint’s crisis has been ongoing since 2014, when the city stopped sourcing its water from Lake Huron in favor of
See full article at Indiewire »

Exclusive: Alec Gillis and Tom Woodruff, Jr., Talk Bringing The Monster to Life

The performances in Bryan Bertino’s The Monster by Zoe Kazan (Ruby Sparks, In the Valley of Elah) and Ella Ballentine (The Captive, Anne of Green Gables) are both exceptional, but as horror fans we care most about the performance of… Continue Reading →

The post Exclusive: Alec Gillis and Tom Woodruff, Jr., Talk Bringing The Monster to Life appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Request: Oscar Nominated Performances of the Aughts, Ranked

by Nathaniel R

This list was requested by Carlos recently in the comments. Perhaps in light of the Oscar Nominated Performances ranked of the past six years... so why not. It's a perfect weekend activity and will help you get in the mood for the possibly turbulent Oscar season ahead. So let's do this crazy...

All The Oscar Nominated Performances Ranked (2000-2009)

First a terrible confession for one such as I: Two Oscar nominated performances in the Aughts slipped right past my movie devouring eyeballs (the shame. the shame.) I never got around to Tommy Lee Jones In the Valley of Elah or Cooler Alec Baldwin. I accept your judgment and will choose my favorite of whatever punishments are recommended.

So let's rank the whole other 198 lot of 'em, with the caveats that this is silly (apples & oranges) and had you asked me on a different day the order might
See full article at FilmExperience »

"Homeland (Iraq Year Zero)"

  • MUBI
“Our point of view follows a trajectory to become the vanishing point of our own failure.” —Jacques Lacan“Who plunged this place of light into darkness?” asks with a heavy heart an Iraqi actor sifting through the bombed ruins of what had once been Iraq's film office and archives. Though rhetorical and sappy it may sound, the question epitomizes the visual dilemma Abbas Fahdel's documentary expands on. At the very centre of Homeland (Iraq Year Zero) are in fact questions of representation, of cultural perspective and omission of the visible. The film, divided into two parts, follows the director's extended family and friends in the run-up to the American invasion of Iraq (“Before the Fall”) and in its fatal aftermath (“After to the Battle”). Presumably due to the family's temporary move to a countryside house during the bombing of Baghdad, the war itself—that is, the military invasion of
See full article at MUBI »

Watch: 'Show Me a Hero' Trailer Brings Oscar Isaac to 'The Wire' in David Simon's HBO Miniseries

Watch: 'Show Me a Hero' Trailer Brings Oscar Isaac to 'The Wire' in David Simon's HBO Miniseries
Since "Treme" went off the air nearly two years ago, the outcry for David Simon's insightful and incisive socio-political storytelling has only increased in demand. Simon responded to national tragedies in Ferguson, Mo and Baltimore, MD — where Simon spent 13 years working for The Baltimore Sun — in his own words through his blog, but many fans are eager to engage in a narrative created, designed and executed by the man behind "The Wire." Read More: Watch: 'Ash Vs. Evil Dead' Live-Action Trailer is 'Looking Good,' Nay, Great "Show Me a Hero" looks to do just that. Starring Oscar Isaac as a mayor of a small New York town, the six-part HBO miniseries chronicles the fallout of community relations when the city is federally mandated to build low-income housing in a white neighborhood. Based on the nonfiction book by Lisa Belkin, the upcoming miniseries is directed by Paul Haggis ("Crash,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘American Sniper’ Passes ‘Hunger Games’ as Top Grossing 2014 Release

‘American Sniper’ Passes ‘Hunger Games’ as Top Grossing 2014 Release
American Sniper” is the highest-grossing 2014 domestic release.

The R-rated drama has made $337.2 million since debuting in a handful of theaters last December. That puts it ahead of “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1″ and its $336.8 million haul as the top film to debut last year.

With a budget of $58.8 million, the biopic of Navy Seal Chris Kyle represents a substantial return on Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow’s investment.

“The heroic story of Chris Kyle just hit the zeitgeist,” said Jeff Goldstein, Warner Bros. distribution executive vice president. “It doesn’t matter your politics — it’s a story that just touched everybody personally.”

Globally, “American Sniper” won’t be able to match the $1.1 billion that “Transformers: Age of Extinction” pulled in, but it has been a robust performer, particularly given that films with patriotic subject matter don’t tend to travel well abroad. It has made more than $140 million in foreign markets.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

20 Actors Who Played The Same Character as a Co-Star

Actors who are cast in a film together often posses a certain quality or look that make them suitable as co-stars. And in this world of sequels, prequels, remakes, and competing franchises, it can be those same characteristics that also make them fitting for the same roles. Here are ten sets of actors who had played, or ended up playing, the same character as their co-star - but in a different movie (with a couple of television series exceptions):

Vito Corleone - Robert De Niro, Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro both earned Oscars for their portrayals of Vito Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's Godfather trilogy. Decades later, the two Vito Corleones starred together in the 2001 heist thriller The Score, which was directed by the voice of Yoda himself, Frank Oz — an offer they couldn't refuse, he must have made them.

Betty Ross - Liv Tyler,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Why ‘American Sniper’ Is a Coming Out Party for Patriotism (Guest Blog)

  • The Wrap
Why ‘American Sniper’ Is a Coming Out Party for Patriotism (Guest Blog)
Moviegoers can finally enjoy a film with a genuine hero who served his country and fought in a righteous war

The New England Patriots spent this past weekend earning a spot in the Super Bowl. But many more patriots went to the movies and propelled “American Sniper” to a record-setting January box office weekend.

In doing so, they officially declared war against the likes of Michael Moore, Seth Rogen and so many liberal, peace loving, pot-smoking A-listers and Hollywood suits who, since the 1970s, have had an ambivalent, if not disdainful relationship with war movies in general, and American patriotism in particular.
See full article at The Wrap »

How ‘American Sniper’ and ‘Lone Survivor’ Revived the War Movie

How ‘American Sniper’ and ‘Lone Survivor’ Revived the War Movie
America’s military misadventures in Iraq and Afghanistan remain deeply unpopular with the general public, but that pessimism isn’t preventing war films such as “American Sniper” and “Lone Survivor” from becoming box office successes.

American Sniper,” a look at Navy Seal Chris Kyle, astounded in its wide-release debut, and is on track to gross $105 million over the Martin Luther King holiday weekend. The Warner Bros. release put up those impressive numbers by appealing to a politically and geographically diverse audience.

“It’s packing them in across blue states and red states,” said Dan Fellman, Warner Bros. domestic distribution chief. “Its’ playing well in big cities and in the heartland. This is about patriotism and all the things people say the country is lacking these days.”

American Sniper’s” commercial success stands in stark contrast to films released at the height of the conflict such as “In the Valley of Elah,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Veteran’s View of ‘American Sniper’ (Guest Column)

A Veteran’s View of ‘American Sniper’ (Guest Column)
Paul Rieckhoff is CEO and founder of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (Iava), an Iraq veteran, and the author of “Chasing Ghosts: Failures and Facades in Iraq: A Soldier’s Perspective.” He offers his thoughts on Clint Eastwood’s “American Sniper” in a guest column.

I’ve seen just about every film about the Iraq War ever made. I’ve produced and associate produced a few. I even appeared in one (for about a millisecond). And without a doubt, “American Sniper” is the single best work of film about the Iraq War ever made.

Now, it’s not the most complex film. Not the deepest film. Not even the most provocative. But in terms of storytelling, action, emotion, production and performance, attention to detail and especially the frighteningly accurate soundscape, there’s been nothing else close that’s been made since my platoon entered the war in Iraq
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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