IMDb > Who Gets to Call It Art? (2006)

Who Gets to Call It Art? (2006) More at IMDbPro »

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Who Gets to Call It Art? -- Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Henry Geldzahler reflects on the 1960s pop art scene in New York.

Overview

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Release Date:
1 February 2006 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Henry Geldzahler reflects on the 1960s pop art scene in New York. | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
Awesome and Important Document of Art & Commerce History - WoWewoahwaow!!!!! See more (3 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
John Chamberlain ... Himself
Ivan Karp ... Himself

George Lois ... Himself
Frank Stella ... Himself
Larry Poons ... Himself
James Rosenquist ... Himself
Jonas Mekas ... Himself

David Hockney ... Himself
Mark Di Suvero ... Himself
Ellsworth Kelly ... Himself

Francesco Clemente ... Himself
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Richard Bellamy ... Himself (archive footage)
Leo Castelli ... Himself (archive footage)

Salvador Dalí ... Himself (archive footage)
Willem de Kooning ... Himself (archive footage)
Helen Frankenthaler ... Herself (archive footage)
Henry Geldzahler ... Himself (archive footage)
Clement Greenberg ... Himself (archive footage)
Hans Hofman ... Himself (archive footage)
Jasper Johns ... Himself (archive footage)
Franz Kline ... Himself (archive footage)
Hilton Kramer ... Himself (archive footage)
Roy Lichtenstein ... Himself (archive footage)
Barnett Newman ... Himself (archive footage)
Claes Oldenburg ... Himself (archive footage)
Jackson Pollock ... Himself (archive footage)
Robert Rauschenberg ... Himself (archive footage)
Robert B. Scull ... Himself (archive footage)
Calvin Tompkins ... Himself (as Calvin Tomkins)

Andy Warhol ... Himself (archive footage)

Directed by
Peter Rosen 
 
Produced by
Beth Rudin DeWoody .... executive producer
Karl Katz .... executive producer
Sara Lukinson .... co-producer
Cathy Price .... executive producer
Peter Rosen .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Jonathan Rho 
Joel Shapiro 
Yan Vizinberg 
 
Film Editing by
Jed Parker 
 
Production Management
Abigail Honor .... production manager
 
Sound Department
John D'Aquino .... sound
Fredrick Helm .... sound (as Frederick Helm)
Brian Hwang .... sound
David S. McJunkin .... sound (as Dave McJunkin)
Anthony Viera .... sound mixer
Kevin Wilson .... post sound mix
 
Visual Effects by
Keith Yurevitz .... digital imaging
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Chris Clarke .... gaffer
Chris Clarke .... grip
Harry Greenberger .... gaffer
Harry Greenberger .... grip
Joseph Keppler .... assistant camera (as Joe Keppler)
William H. Miller .... camera operator
David P. Ramos .... gaffer (as Dave Ramos)
David P. Ramos .... grip (as Dave Ramos)
Bernard Russo .... gaffer
Bernard Russo .... grip
 
Editorial Department
Jeremy Ambers .... assistant editor
Bill Stokes .... colorist
 
Other crew
William Claxton .... source: photos
Maggie Coleman .... researcher
Nadine Covert .... researcher
Robert Doisneau .... source: photos
Sally Edelman .... source: photographs
Caryn Havlik .... researcher
Gabriella Hiatt .... researcher
Lizzie Himmel .... source: photographs
Maya Joseph-Goteiner .... researcher
Paul Joyce .... source: photos
Joan Kron .... source: photos
Fred McDarrah .... source: photographs (as Fred W. McDarrah)
Ugo Mulas .... source: photographs
Hans Namuth .... source: photographs
Arnold Newman .... source: photographs
Tammie Rhee .... researcher
Jodi Roberts .... researcher
Anne-Marie Rosen .... researcher
Naomi Saito .... researcher
Andrea Sholler .... researcher
James Van DerZee .... source: photographs
Eva Wah .... researcher
Sarah Waller .... researcher
Meldia Yesayan .... researcher
Linda Zimmerman .... researcher
 
Thanks
Kay Bearman .... special thanks
Randy Borscheidt .... special thanks (as Randall Borsheidt)
Ted Feder .... special thanks
Barbara File .... special thanks
Raymond Foye .... special thanks
Robert Harms .... special thanks
Ashton Hawkins .... special thanks
Janet Hicks .... special thanks
Harold Holzer .... special thanks
Ellsworth Kelly .... special thanks
Scott Kilgour .... special thanks
Christopher Noey .... special thanks
Claes Oldenburg .... special thanks
Barbara Rauch .... special thanks
Peter Rauch .... special thanks
Michael Slade .... special thanks
Tom Slaughter .... special thanks
Matko Tomicic .... special thanks
Ray Charles White .... special thanks
Jule Zeftel .... special thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Runtime:
78 min
Country:
Language:
Color:

Did You Know?

Movie Connections:
Features A Bigger Splash (1973)See more »

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9 out of 9 people found the following review useful.
Awesome and Important Document of Art & Commerce History - WoWewoahwaow!!!!!, 25 March 2007
Author: czarnobog from United States

This little gem may represent the last gasp of healthy symbiotic intersection between pure art and the world of commerce, a centuries old tradition that died with the rise of corporate supremacy in the latter half of the 20th century.

Henry Geldzahler is lovingly memorialized by world class artists Frank Stella, Jasper Johns, David Hockney and others. Born into a wealthy family of Belgian diamond merchants, Geldzahler transcended his illustrious materialistic roots to inject himself as a potent and active force in the world of modern art. A maverick assistant curator at New York's Metropolitan Museum, Geldzahler was prescient enough to recognize the future of art and instrumental in establishing America's modern artists as a force to be reckoned with.

Geldzahler stands primarily as an example of someone who was born into incredible privilege, yet used his social advantage as but a starting point for a career that influenced American culture at the highest intellectual level.

Testimony to his importance lies in the multitude of flattering portraits of Geldzahler completed by the greatest American artists of his era, many of whom appear in this documentary to lend oral tribute to him as well.

While Geldzahler's story makes this a must see for anyone interested in the arts (particularly Modern American art) or in the depiction of a brilliantly realized upper class life, the most precious clips are those showing Geldzahler's friends at their best: Andy Warhol's brief but trenchant observations are well worth sitting through this on their own, and Frank Stella's comments brilliantly illuminate the state of the arts in 50s and 60s America, and Geldzahler's place in that scene.

Anyone interested in the arts will appreciate Geldzahler's incredible ability to recognize art at its inception, years before the slugs of Middle American society were able to grasp its significance, and only with the aid of forward-thinking guides like Geldzahler to explain it.

Geldzahler was that rarest of species: a person who could have easily coasted through life on the coat-tails of his ancestors, fat and happy on the dregs of their accomplishments, yet rose beyond their limitations to affect the course of art history by recognizing and supporting worthy and brilliant artists who may otherwise have been overlooked, with no social or political agenda to affect his artistic judgments.

Geldzahler represents the last of an extinct breed. Uncorrupted and uncompromised, he intersected with the creative community in a way that is impossible even for the most powerful of today's media moguls, who ultimately must answer to their brainless corporate uberlords.

Art lovers should watch this, and appreciate that there was a time when art for art's sake had its champions, and wealthy educated patrons were as pure of heart as the artists they championed.

Artists will watch it, and wish they had been born when Geldzahler still walked the earth.

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